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PostPosted: Sun Feb 25, 2007 1:42 pm 
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Joined: Sun Feb 25, 2007 1:09 pm
Posts: 11
Location: UK
A brief history about my 11 year old son. He had multiple food allergies from the age of 18mths. Asthma finally diagnosed at the age of 3. Atopic excema also. Still suffers with with bougts of excema and bad asthma, but most of the food allergies he has grown out of.

His reactions were severe facial swelling to houmous, this happened at the age of 3. It had only touched his lips. At the age of 8 it happened again. Instant facial swelling, this happend round my sisters house. But over the last 10mths my son had been having pirtiton every day for some reaction or another, and in the past we had suspected sesame to be the culprit, we tried where possible to avoid it.

Sesame seed buns would cause slight reation aroung the lips, but not every time. So it was a lttle confusing, although an oral food challenge hospital did confirm an allergy to it, but it seemed only mild. A couple of hours after the challenge my son, felt sick, dizzy, came out in hives and felt breathless. Chinese food also makes my son feel ill and he needs pirtiton also. Although we only discovered the link due to a positive food challenge.

My question is, as im very confused with regards sesame allergy. Does this warrant an Epi pen??? We are due to see allergy consultant in march.

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I have two children, one 7 year old with mild dairy and egg intolerance, and an 11 year son with different allergies. Ie dust/cats/dogs/sesame seed.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 25, 2007 1:48 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
It does warrent an epi-pen. The thing is...if you have allergies, an epi-pen is your best friend, not a scary needle to avoid. If you are at risk ...you definitely want to have the medication that can help you.

_________________
DD age 9 1/2 -peanuts, nuts,
DD age 7 1/2 - milk, eggs, chicken, peanuts, treenuts, cats, dogs,
DS age 2 1/2
Husband- asthma, eggs, treenuts, fish, shellfish environmental
Self - penicillan, eurithromiacin, mild laytex allergy.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 25, 2007 3:15 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
scallywag wrote:
Chinese food also makes my son feel ill and he needs pirtiton also. Although we only discovered the link due to a positive food challenge.


When Chinese food is not cooked in peanut oil it is cooked in sesame seed oil.

My reactions to sesame seeds were originally just an embarrassement and inconvenience. Over time they became anaphylactic. I would recommend asking the doctor for a prescription for an epi-pen.

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 25, 2007 6:53 pm 
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Joined: Sun Feb 25, 2007 1:09 pm
Posts: 11
Location: UK
thanks for your replies guys, I am in the UK by the way.

Anna Marie, so you think that it wouldnt be unreasonable to ask about an epi pen.
How long did it take for your allergy to become an anaphylatic one.?

Just one question, if he was anaphlatic to sesame, it would of happened in hospital when he had the food challenge. Does it work this way??? The reaction happened a couple of hours after the challenge.

The plan is not to be fobbed off by the allergy consultant in march, If my son needs an epi pen then i want him to have one, but if the allergy nurse thought my son could have a severe reaction in the future then my doctor would have been informed and i would already have been given an epi pen, so i am assuming that he cant warrant one.

But i dont understand sesame allergy.

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I have two children, one 7 year old with mild dairy and egg intolerance, and an 11 year son with different allergies. Ie dust/cats/dogs/sesame seed.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 25, 2007 9:58 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 6:48 pm
Posts: 614
Location: Ontario, Canada / Cambridge, UK
Piriton (similar to Benadryl in Canada) is an anti-histamine and it works only to treat hives, itching and swelling. You can't rely on Piriton as proper allergy treatment. It will be useless if there is an anaphylactic reaction. Only epinephrine (Epipen) can treat anaphylaxis... and a visit to the emergency room. Unfortunately, there seems to be a shortage of allergists in the UK... so it's good you have an appointment with a consultant. Make sure your son gets tested with a skin prick test, blood test or even a patch test. In my opinion, your son should have been prescribed an Epipen after the oral challenge in the hospital, as you say it did confirm an allergy, even if the reaction was mild. The thing with allergies is.... you never know how severe each reaction will be, hence the need for an Epipen.

I believe that doctors in the UK hesitate to prescribe Epipens. I think I read an article about it on this site. I'll see if I can find it. Gwen, was it you who posted it?

In the meantime, avoid all foods with sesame in it and also read labels for possible cross-contamination. Keep a log of what your son eats and his reactions.

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16-year-old son: peanuts, nuts, raw egg whites, asthmatic
Self: allergic rhinitis, fragrance/chemical sensitivities, oral allergy syndrome


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 25, 2007 10:09 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 919
Location: Oakville, Ontario
Welcome to the forum scallywag! I'm sure you will find this group very supportive and helpful.

Our 5 year old son has multiple food allergies (diagnosed at 12 months of age) including sesame. Sesame seed appears on the 9 most common food allergens in Canada, and it absolutely can be anaphylactic. Our experience in dealing with sesame allergy is that it is commonly found in bread as either an ingredient or a "may contain". It took us quite some time to determine that bread was causing some of our son's reactions. We have been making our own bread for the past two years (using a breadmaker), and he has not had a single reaction to sesame in that time. We've also found a few "safe" breads (i.e. no sesame).

You must ask your doctor for an Epipen in dealing with sesame allergy.

_________________
15 yr old daughter: no health issues
12 yr old son: allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, fish, sesame, sunflower, mustard, poppy seeds, green peas, some fruits, instructed to avoid all other legumes (except soy & green beans), pollen, cats, horses


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 25, 2007 10:23 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 6:48 pm
Posts: 614
Location: Ontario, Canada / Cambridge, UK
A follow up to my previous post, I found the article. It was Karen who posted it. Read the thread here: http://www.allergicliving.com/forum/vie ... php?t=1334

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16-year-old son: peanuts, nuts, raw egg whites, asthmatic
Self: allergic rhinitis, fragrance/chemical sensitivities, oral allergy syndrome


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 2007 1:42 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:09 am
Posts: 1054
scallywag wrote:
Just one question, if he was anaphlatic to sesame, it would of happened in hospital when he had the food challenge. Does it work this way??? The reaction happened a couple of hours after the challenge.

I'm not an expert on sesame allergy...but in response to your question, I've taken the following quote from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anaphylaxis :

Quote:
The time between ingestion of the allergen and anaphylaxis symptoms can vary for some patients depending on the amount of allergen ingested and sensitivity. Symptoms can appear immediately, or can be delayed by half an hour to several hours after ingestion.[4] However, symptoms of anaphylaxis usually appear very quickly once they do begin.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 2007 2:13 pm 
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Joined: Sun Feb 25, 2007 1:09 pm
Posts: 11
Location: UK
Many thanks for your replies guys, isnt it amazing how different our health systems are. In the uk we are very short on Allergy consultants, and the person i will be seeing isnt a specialist in the field, shes a Dr but there isnt any one else to fill the spot as the professor of allergy at our hospital has left to go to london.

Thank you for the note on epi pens. The uk dont like to issue them, but as im aware in canada and america who are very clued up on allergy, would have without a doubt have issued me with one, this makes me particulary worried that my son could be at risk. He is now 11 and venturing out, i cant be there to make sure he is not eating what he shouldnt, this makes it even more important to have an epi pen, in my opinion. I agree with the comments that of course very few deaths are caused through anapylaxics (not spelt correctly) but that is because people are more vigilant about what they are eating. Is the uk banking on the fact that mistakes arnt made???

With regards to my son having a bad reaction, its more of a case of not 'if' but 'when'.
thats how i feel about it. The reason a bad reaction hasnt happened is because we watch what he eats.

In your opinion of allergies and how it is dealt with in canada, would you have been issued with an epi pen if you had a son with similar reactions to sesame seed.

Thanks guys........ Scallywag

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I have two children, one 7 year old with mild dairy and egg intolerance, and an 11 year son with different allergies. Ie dust/cats/dogs/sesame seed.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 2007 5:16 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 6:48 pm
Posts: 614
Location: Ontario, Canada / Cambridge, UK
Scallywag,

In my experience (in Canada), when my son had an allergic reaction (at the age of 2), the hospital referred him to an allergist who did a skin prick test. When the tests came out positive, he was prescribed an Epipen (with several repeats... one for home, one for daycare, one for school, etc). He has been re-tested a few more times since then. I think your son's symptoms would definitely have warranted a referral to an allergist for testing (skin prick or blood test). That's the first course of action, not an oral food challenge.

In the UK, as there is a shortage of allergists, the doctors and hospitals tend to treat the symptoms and recommend Piriton. In Canada, even if the reactions are minor, you can get your GP to refer you to an allergist but that doesn't seem to be the case in the UK.

I don't know where in the UK you are located but I found an interesting document from January 2003. It deals specifically with the North West but the info is still useful. Of particular interest are sections 7, 8 and 12.7.

Cheers!

_________________
16-year-old son: peanuts, nuts, raw egg whites, asthmatic
Self: allergic rhinitis, fragrance/chemical sensitivities, oral allergy syndrome


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2007 12:48 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
I agree with Storm - I think you would have been prescribed an EpiPen.

In Canada you can buy them over-the-counter without a prescription. Is that the case in the U.K.? Have you asked a pharmacist about this? In Canada, private medical insurance won't pay for it without a prescription, but if I were in your shoes and could get my hands on one, I'd buy one even if I had to pay myself.

Your son should be carrying an EpiPen at all times and train his friends how to use it (once he gets one), especially given his age. Teens are at greater risk than younger children since they are starting to be more independent, are trying new things, and are moving away from their parents' protective and watchful eyes.

Check out Allergy Safe Communities at http://www.allergysafecommunities.ca/pa ... p?catid=11 for some good basic info on anaphylaxis. This site is based on the Canadian anaphylaxis guidelines. In particular, you might want to read the Emergency Protocol, which is very informative.

I would also talk to the doctor about your son's asthma, as people with asthma are at greater risk of having a more severe allergic reaction - especially if the asthma isn't well controlled. See http://www.allergysafecommunities.ca/pa ... atsubid=19 for details.

I don't want to freak you out... I'm thinking (hoping) that perhaps this info would help you in your quest for the EpiPen!

Take care, and let us know if you are successful in getting your hands on an EpiPen.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:24 pm 
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Joined: Sun Feb 25, 2007 1:09 pm
Posts: 11
Location: UK
Hi thanks again for your replies, it really helps.

In the uk you can not buy an epi pen, they need to be prescribed. Our appointment is on the 8th march and i feel armed with some information for the doctor. I am hoping that some of the advice that you have given me will help.

I have spoken to my son about an epi pen and how he would feel about being prescribed one, but he is quite adamant about not carrying it around when with friends, he doesnt want to be singled out and different because of it, i am not even aloud to mention it to friends parents if he stays any where. This is a difficult age and a worrying age because he is testing the boundaries naturally. After the sesame challenge my son is still convinced that he felt sick after the challenge because he was being forced to eat something he really thought tasted disgusting. He says thats the reason....I have a rebellious little teenager on my hands.........

Oh by the way, he was referred for skin prick testing and the sesame seed was positive, along with tree nuts, but he has since had food challenges for tree nuts and didnt react at all. There was a marked difference between the nut challenges and sesame one.

Hope all are well and i much appreciate your comments.

_________________
I have two children, one 7 year old with mild dairy and egg intolerance, and an 11 year son with different allergies. Ie dust/cats/dogs/sesame seed.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2007 5:48 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
scallywag wrote:
Anna Marie, so you think that it wouldnt be unreasonable to ask about an epi pen.
How long did it take for your allergy to become an anaphylatic one.?

Just one question, if he was anaphlatic to sesame, it would of happened in hospital when he had the food challenge. Does it work this way??? The reaction happened a couple of hours after the challenge.


For several years my reactions were itchy, blotchy, hives. I kept eating my allergens because I had no idea what I was allergic to. It was several years before I had an anaphylactic reaction.

Your family doctor should be able to prescribe an epi-pen. Are you positive a prescription is required? I was sure they were required here, but it turned out I was wrong. Because it is an *emergency* medication it can be purchased without a prescription. If you haven't already checked, I would suggest asking a pharmacist (doctor's don't always know).

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2007 5:50 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
I wanted to add, if you do get an epi-pen for your son -- we can help you find a carrier for it. :D If he gets to help pick one out he might be more inclined to carry it. I have to cook dinner right now, but tomorrow I'll try to search some of the UK sites I've found over the years that might have carriers.

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2007 6:58 pm 
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Joined: Sun Feb 25, 2007 1:09 pm
Posts: 11
Location: UK
Anne-marie, in the uk the doctor can only prescribe the epi pen on referral from the hospital. But i will certainly ask the the pharmacy tommorow if i can possibly buy one. Its worth asking the question, i will let you know how i get on.

_________________
I have two children, one 7 year old with mild dairy and egg intolerance, and an 11 year son with different allergies. Ie dust/cats/dogs/sesame seed.


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