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PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2007 3:38 pm 
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Location: Victoria BC
Hello everyone as a result of the Vancouver Sun Front Page article today, the producers of CBC radio has contacted us and will be doing a segment on BC Almanace between 1 & 1:30 PST Wednesday afternoon.

I am sure you can listen live on line as well just select bc as your region.

This is all so good!


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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2007 10:52 am 
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Go here to listen today: http://www.cbc.ca/listen/index.html#

Pick Vancouver.

You'll need a Windows Media Player to listen. There's a download if you haven't already got one installed.

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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2007 6:41 pm 
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I had to go out to an appt that ran long, and missed it. Shoot.

Did anyone hear the show? How was it?

Really hope B.C. Almanac will put it up in their Archives so we can hear it.

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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2007 10:27 pm 
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Location: Victoria, British Columbia
The radio show was GREAT! (I listened at work while I scanned some photos for a project.) I was so impressed by both Sara and Tracy -- they did an awesome job.

One mom called in to say it was difficult to work around the restrictions because some kids 'might' have allergies. Sara was wonderful -- she thanked the caller and then said that Sabrina's Law is more about making people aware of the dangers, as well as reminding kids about hand washing and other measures that help kids avoid a reaction. Tracy also reiterated that the bill in BC is NOT about banning any kind of food -- it is about awareness, education, and knowing what to do in case of an emergency. Tracy mentioned how there might be strategies in place like a table where the food in question can be consumed away from the child with allergies. Sara mentioned how important that is as only trace amounts can really harm a child.

I saw that BC Almanac has put out a 'teaser' about the hour long show -- it will be online soon enough. Check out http://www.cbc.ca/bcalmanac/ regularly for a link.

Caroline

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 Post subject: BC Almanac
PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2007 1:50 am 
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Location: Victoria BC
Thanks CAroline for the kind words. It was my goal to tell people about the bill and why legislation was key. I tried hard to keep that my statement in whatever I was responding to.
Sadly it will not be archived as CBC does not yet archive Almanac, they are doing it one show at a a time. but the producer's assistant is working on getting me a file that I can download on an ipod or maybe a good old fashioned cd. if I get the ipod, I can share the mp3 file, i think??? not sure but my trusty sidekick (husband) can figure that out.

Sara was great - she is such a pleasure to listen to, even though it breaks your heart.


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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2007 10:46 am 
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Caroline2 wrote:
Tracy also reiterated that the bill in BC is NOT about banning any kind of food -- it is about awareness, education, and knowing what to do in case of an emergency. Tracy mentioned how there might be strategies in place like a table where the food in question can be consumed away from the child with allergies.

I know that Sabrina's Law doesn't require or speak to the banning of allergenic foods and that the legislation we're pulling for in BC is modeled after Sabrina's Law -- but I'm curious -- are there not situations where banning allergenic foods is necessary to comply with the component of Sabrina's Law that says:
Quote:
Strategies that reduce the risk of exposure to anaphylactic causative agents in classrooms and common school areas.

For example: if we're dealing with 3 and 4-year-old children who can be messy eaters, and not the most skilled at hand washing, wouldn't the banning of highly transferable allergens be a logical possibility? I know everyone's careful not to say the highly charged "ban" word when it comes to food allergies -- but I do think that in some situations, it makes the most sense. I think every situation is different and that parents and educators need to work together to create the safest environment for their child(ren) but I do also think that it's important that everyone understand that even while working within the legislation, that there are situations where a ban on a particular allergen will make the most sense (either within the classroom or school-wide). I think if we completely skirt the "ban" topic when discussing legislation, when a ban is imposed at some school, down the road to ensure a child's safety -- people will come back and say: "I thought this wasn't about banning foods....?". Just some thoughts.


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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2007 12:39 pm 
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I think (ethansmom) you make a good point and yes there are situations where it is most practical to ban the foods and yes it needs to be a cooperative discussion amongst all parties, school and parents. I think you have raised a valid point and I look forward to hearing everyone's thoughts on this.

I know in our school we have a Kindergartener who is anaphylactic to milk and eggs - 2 things that are difficult to ban. what they have done for him for Grade 1 for next year is to ensure that there is extra adult supervision during snack and lunch times and that there is additional support to ensure that all tables are wiped down appropriately and that good handwashing is done by all children. These measures seem to have accomodated everyone without implementing an all out ban. I would like to see them also not allow these foods on the playground but I am not certain what has been decided about outdoor times.

on the other hand, our preschool for ages 3 & 4 which is a private preschool, as most are I guess, and they ban foods if there is an allergy in the class to that food. for example, for milk allergies they will ban soft cheeses, yogurts and antyhing messy but you can bring hard cheese although I don't think anyone does out of respect for that child.

In both situations parents have been supportive of the bans because of the severity and age of the child. I like to think that for the most part this will be true but from experience we know it is not.


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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2007 8:47 pm 
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The radio show is now available as a download at the cbc site from May 9. I can't get the download to work on my machine but it could be Mac oriented!
Caroline

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PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2007 3:17 am 
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Location: Vancouver, BC
The problem is that the word "BAN" is very highly charged and it always creates problems. We should not use the word ban or the words "******-free" because it always gets people's knickers in a knot and ends up with everyone being very divided and that is not what we want to do. It is better to use the terms "strategies to minimize exposure to allergens" and "allergy aware". It is all semantics but it is very important.

If you have a ban it implies 100% compliance and zero tolerance and that is just not realistic. It is better to try to ask cooperatively for everyone to (out of the goodness of their hearts) not bring the allergen to school. For the ones who insist on bringing the allergen, there are strategies that can be put into place eg - have strict protocol over where and how the allergen is consumed to minimize the allergen, or substituting a safe but similar food for the allergen, etc. It is easier to get the non-allergic community on board is we ask rather than tell them what to do.

At this point, we have hugh support from the general public, and so it is clear that the tide has turned and they are ready to make the schools safer for children. Education and awareness are the best ways to achieve this.

The younger the child, the more that is done to protect them, but the fatalities are our adolescents. We need to ensure that schools understand the developmental stages that a child with allergies goes through and ensure that support is available at the critical times in an individuals life. And as parents, we need to understand this too. I have not yet figured out how I am going to deal with it when Aaron goes to high school, but I visited his future high school last night and there were peanut products in the vending machines and peanut candy bars for sale in the concession. His elementary school has been very supportive, but I think I should be working on his high school now. (it is 3 years before he'll be there - but maybe we'll have legislation by then and I won't have to do it :lol: )


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PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2007 10:43 am 
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Location: Victoria BC
Hello, has anyone been able to actually listen to the CBC open line show from Tuesday. we have tried but we keep getting that the file is not valid. I even had my somewhat techhy husband on it....

Gwen, any luck for you? I think this might be all of the callbacks from the audience which I would love to hear. I will have to send them an email at their site later tonight.


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PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2007 11:15 am 
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I understand the whole semantics thing and I know that even if a school has a so-called "ban" in place -- it doesn't mean everyone is complying anyway. I think what I'm feeling is that because there is a portion of the general public that will be more "on-side" with the legislation "as long as it doesn't impact their lives or the lives of their kids in anyway" -- that there is this need to drive home to people that we're not talking about food bans. I do think it's important that we come across as not trying to force anyone to do anything -- that we are asking parents and kids to have compassion and to voluntarily comply with requests about food. Having said that -- the point is that with allergic kids in the classroom -- other kids will be affected and impacted, (to varying degrees). I think it's important that people understand that no, the legislation is not about food bans, but it is about reducing the risk to the anaphylactic child -- and yes, that will require that you and your child make different choices about food and how or where certain food is consumed. I do think that this legislation will do wonders at educating people about food allergies and explaining why parents of FA kids make the requests they do.
I totally agree that more emphasis needs to be placed on keeping older kids at risk of anaphylaxis safe at school. I do also feel that as kids get older, parents and kids need to continue to be super vigilant about educating themselves about the risks and how to reduce the risks (like carrying epinephrine at all times). When this legislation passes (and I say when, not if!!!) I think it will help bring an increased awareness and discussion about anaphylaxis -- so hopefully a teenager at risk, instead of trying to hide it from their friends, will have a support system of friends in place who will not only know about their need for epinephrine, but will not allow them to go anywhere without it!


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PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2007 6:39 pm 
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Tracy,

Can't get it to work either.
Think the link is faulty.

I e-mailed. You may want to as well. Would love to hear it.

Pam, amen, to working with adolescents. Study after study shows how needed this is.

Gwen

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PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2007 1:44 pm 
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Tracy, I was never able to get that link to work, and now I think it's gone.

Did you get a copy of the program?

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 Post subject: CBC intervie
PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2007 2:53 pm 
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Location: Victoria BC
I did get a chance to listen to it but I could not figure out a way to save it... sorry Gwen. if you really want it, I think we can order it from the company that stores their stuff.. or I can see if I can get a copy from Heiko?


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