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 Post subject: Another Newbie
PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2007 6:03 am 
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Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2007 1:00 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Bath, U.K.
I'm new here and glad to find other people who also suffer from multiple allergies. I've had allergy problems since childhood and rather than it getting better over time, it's generally gotten worse. Armed with a box of antihistamines, asthma inhalers and an Epi-Pen, I feel a little saver venturing out these days, and thanks to a few natural health aids I do find that I'm at least no longer getting worse - touch wood.

I have a few common allergies, like a metal allergy and insect venom allergy, and then a few weird ones too, like a soap allergy - no, not the perfumes and fragrances but the actual soap, i.e. sodium palmate / sodium citrate, over which there's always plenty of scepticism until I break out in a rash and swell up like a blow-fish minutes after exposure.

I look forward to learning a little bit more about other people's experiences and coping mechanisms for living with allergies.

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Like a patient etherised upon a table...
Anaphylaxis, asthma, allergic contact dermatitis, rhinitis, urticaria, oral allergy syndrome


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2007 9:51 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
Hi Delene and welcome to the forum.

Is the chronic fatigue also allergy related? I have an on-line friend whose chronic fatigue improved when she successfully elimianted all of her allergens from her diet. I don't think the fatigue is completely gone, but it's become less and therefore easier to live with.

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self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2007 10:23 am 
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Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2007 1:00 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Bath, U.K.
Hi AnnaMarie,

Thank you for the warm welcome. The chronic fatigue is definitely allergy related. I doubt that eliminating all allergens - if that was possible - would cure the fatigue, since I do have other concurrent medical problems, but it is a significant factor for me and every positive step I make towards reducing my allergies is rewarded with a definite increase in energy.

The allergy medication also significantly reduce my energy levels. I've managed to 'down-grade' to the milder forms and reduce the dosage by supplementing naturally, but I still use daily medication, and fatigue is a major side-effect.

Avoidance is a constant struggle with multiple allergies, but definitely worth it. I think your on-line friend definitely has the right idea.

_________________
D
Like a patient etherised upon a table...
Anaphylaxis, asthma, allergic contact dermatitis, rhinitis, urticaria, oral allergy syndrome


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:26 pm 
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Site Admin

Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2948
Location: Toronto
Hi Delene,

Welcome to Allergic Living's forum. Hope things continue to improve in terms of understanding your allergies. Think/hope you will find some useful discussion on these boards.

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Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2007 6:22 am 
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Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2007 1:00 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Bath, U.K.
Hi,

I think understanding allergies is winning half the battle, so to speak. The fact that allergies are complex and highly variable from person to person makes understanding that much harder, but also that much more rewarding an experience. Take the small pleasures in life where you can get them, I suppose.

Practical knowledge always fills in gaps that theoretical knowledge inevitably leaves. I've read just about everything I can get my hands on, but practical situations still arise where theoretical knowledge never quite covers it and it's either muddling through or learning from others' experiences. I have already found some useful discussion on these boards - there's no substitute for experience and it's a learning curve for me to both see the similarities and differences in others who struggle with the same problem.

_________________
D
Like a patient etherised upon a table...
Anaphylaxis, asthma, allergic contact dermatitis, rhinitis, urticaria, oral allergy syndrome


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2007 10:18 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
You've summed that up very nicely.

Multiple food allergies definitely make everything harder in a multitude of ways.

I can't stand taking antihistamine daily -- I did it for years. It made me sleepy, cranky, and made me cry. I don't cry well. It's not like on tv where the woman looks aaaa crying -- nope, I just get red and blotchy.

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2007 10:38 am 
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Site Admin

Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2948
Location: Toronto
AM, Too funny and too true that many of the "good" (as in, they work) antihistamines make you drowsy. Or in 'some' cases, cranky. :)

Delene, in terms of understanding, it is such a process. In addition to my mainstream food allergies, I react to alcohol, and have yet to undergo the battery of tests that would be required to try to figure out which of the innumerable ingredients and chemicals makes me do so. You might think sulphites, and I do get facial flaring to grapes. But yet I can eat fruits or sundried tomatoes with sulphites and can eat raisins (without sulphites) with no ill effect. So it's probably something else.

My point would be - I don't understand those reactions, but I do know that if I avoid alcohol, I'm perfectly healthy. So I do, and now that I'm used to it, I'm not sure I miss it enough to take the time to do all the tests. And my skin has improved.

But then there are times that I'd like to order food in a French restaurant (where everything is braised in wine) without risking hives all over my face. So for me, it's a process of understanding our bodies and our tolerance for accommodation in our lives.

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Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 20, 2007 4:49 am 
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Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2007 1:00 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Bath, U.K.
I'm throwing the towel in with anti-histamines today. My doctor recommends taking them twice a day - double what the pack says - and I'm completely wasted and more tired than I've been in a while. And I still wake up blotchy and swollen and itchy, so why bother? It helps minimally, but I'm still stuck in-doors for the duration of summer since grass is a major allergen and I'm surrounded by hectares of green grass - pretty, but frustrating. I've been on and off anti-histamines for the majority of my life - time for an off-phase, I think.

I understand the feeling re:ordering food from a French restaurant. I have a severe sulphite sensitivity and wine is a big no-no. I lived in wine-country in South Africa for 4 years whilst doing my degree and absolutely everything comes with wine, is laced with wine, drenched in wine or cooked with wine. Maddening really, particularly since I love a bottle of good red wine and it's used to be so difficult to be the odd one out.

That's the crux of the problem for me really. I dislike being the one that's always producing a list of allergens and no longer eat out since restaurants simply don't understand that when I say I'm allergic, I mean: I'm allergic. Not that I think I might be allergic. I break out in hives, can't breath, collapse and will lie on your floor unconscious allergic.

It's a two-edged sword. On the one hand, there's the process of identifying allergens and on the other there's the process of learning how to live with the ones that have been identified. So it is a continuous process of understanding and adapting. Patience has to be the biggest virtue.

_________________
D
Like a patient etherised upon a table...
Anaphylaxis, asthma, allergic contact dermatitis, rhinitis, urticaria, oral allergy syndrome


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