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PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2007 6:38 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2006 4:35 pm
Posts: 115
Location: Vancouver
Hi All,
I went to see my allergist yesterday to get retested for my " newly acquired nut allergies" and while the skin tests are still positive the hives on my arms were less severe this year than last yr when I was first tested...which is good news.
But here is a qn for all you parents out there...my son is now 6 months old and I have just introduced him to rice cereal and banana....
I asked the allergist yeterday re if and when we should get the baby tested and he more or less shrugged it off stating that my son would have a 30-50 percent chance of also having nut allergies and the only way to check would be to give him some peanut butter and other nut butters after age one....and to see if he reacts and to bring him in for skin pricks after the protein has been introduced in his system....
Hmm, not sure if I like that answer!!
And it also means I cannot kiss him!!!!
But!
Any advise as to how and what types of foods to introduce to him from now on in order to minimise any reactions to foods??????
Again, I got a very vague, non -descipt answer from the allergist!
Thanks
Shairose


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2007 7:28 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6455
Location: Ottawa
1. If he hasn't been exposed, he wouldn't have developed the antibodies yet.
2. If he is susceptable to developing allergies I would recommend that you hold off introducing the potential allergen until he is 5. (Our allergist gave us this recommendation)
3. If you plan to kiss him don't eat any peanutbutter.
:)

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Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2007 9:48 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
I agree that one year old is far too young to be trying peanuts or tree nuts. I personally would wait until your child is at least 3 years old to try peanuts or tree nuts if he doesn't have any food allergies at that point, and even until 5 years (as Susan said) if he does have other food allergies.

As for how to introduce new foods, I can send you a little protocol developed by Janice Vickerstaff Joneja that is very useful. Just send me an email at forumadmin@allergicliving.com to let me know your email address and I will send you the PDF. That way at least you are introducing foods in a relatively safe manner.

See also http://www.hallpublications.com/title1_sample1.html and http://www.hallpublications.com/title1_sample2.html for some helpful info. Not all allergists believe in this info but frankly, it's the only thing I've ever seen out there that at least tries to give parents some direction on where to start when introducing foods to their babies at risk of allergies.

NOTE: For me, the part of the "Sequence of Adding Solid Foods for the Allergic Infant" table that says "after 2 years" should be changed to "after 3 years".

Hope this helps.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject: Thanks !
PostPosted: Wed Apr 25, 2007 12:34 am 
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Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2006 4:35 pm
Posts: 115
Location: Vancouver
HI Susan and Karen,
Thanks for both your responses.
The interesting thing is that there are all kinds of literature out there and each one states something differently.
I was quite surprised when my allergist asked me to introduce p/butter at age 1. Most literature I have come across states age 3 if either parent has a nut allergy.
Susan, I am aware that antibodies are formed after intro to foods...in this case nuts....
And oh I am not about to kiss him after he tries p/butter! Poor baby!
Karen, I have emailed you already and appreciate you emailing the info....
Tomorrow we try a teeney little bit of mushy carrot and see how that goes!
Again, both your expertise is appreciated!
Shairose


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 22, 2007 1:19 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 03, 2006 8:23 pm
Posts: 190
Sounds like that particular doctor wasn't up on his research. I'd definitely hold off until age 5.


Last edited by Andrea_MASG on Wed Sep 24, 2008 8:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2007 5:34 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 9:25 pm
Posts: 238
Location: Thornhill
It's so interesting...

I know most of the research pushes to hold off introduction until at least 3 years of age but I have never been able to find fact-based data to support this. Although my DD was diagnosed as ana and asthmatic, she was introduced to peanuts and almond quite early, perhaps before we even had the egg/dairy diagnosis. For us, the fat in nuts was a dietician (Sick Kids) recommendation following the sesame diagnosis. (long story but she needed to catch up on weight and we had to cover multiple fats/fat types in her diet). Also, our allergist happens to be one who doesn't recommend waiting -- has the suspicion (also not fact-based) that waiting to introduce these foods can be detrimental. I do know I had stumbled on some research that pointed to the low peanut/nut allergy rate in countries where they are early foods (Singapore, S. Africa, Thailand...)

Anyway, I still don't know what we will do with our DS and clearly I am inconsistent (early PB yet *just* tried eggplant). Sigh, I just wish there was solid, consistent, hard data

About the risks of allergies (Shairose's original post) - does anyone have data on this? I know I have been told that my DD had a 2% chance of developing allergies. Some stats seem to insinuate that my DS will now be 80% likely while the allergist says his risk is only 7%...

(sorry, rambling)

_________________
renie
daughter: ana for egg, sesame, dairy, pistachio/cashew/hazelnut. on contact. allergic+ to soy protein isolate, environmental allergies (e.g. dogs, dust mites). asthma. eczema.
son: peanuts, tree-nuts, OAS, environmental allergies. asthma.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2007 9:47 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
The standard line I have heard is that if one parent has allergies, the children have about a 35% chance of having allergies, and if both parents have allergies, the children have about a 70% or so (maybe as high as 80%?) chance of having allergies.

And it doesn't have to be food allergies. Any kind of allergy.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject: Wow!
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2007 10:25 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2007 1:27 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Guelph, ON
So many different "takes" on research!

I've been told that kids who have parents with allergies have a 50% chance of developing SOME allergy. There has been NO research which found a correlation when it comes to the specific type of allergy, thank goodness!

Actually the "wait until" rule is a fallacy. It comes from the data that proposes that 20% of kids with a severe allergy outgrow it by age 3. So the idea became, if you wait until then, they may have had the allergy but do not anymore...so less kids will react after age 3.

We all have to do what we feel comfortable with :lol:


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2007 8:52 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 9:25 pm
Posts: 238
Location: Thornhill
Agreed, whether it is dealing with schools, play dates or meals at home, we all have to do what is comfortable for ourselves/our families. As you might be able to tell with my craziness, oh, I mean anxiety, it's the journey of finding comfortable that is a good part of the challenge! (Thank heavens for you guys!) I know that for me personally, it is challenging to find the balance between protection/feeling safe and acceptable risk. Feeling that if I accept a risk (like go to a party) and a reaction ensues, that I'm responsible

It seems to me that there must be a lack of funding / lack of research on allergies (and asthma with it). So many different instructions and more questions than answers

Back to Shairose's original ask...
the few recommendations that I would live by are:

--never introduce anything new late in the day; if there is going to be a reaction, best when you are alert and can manage the time in hospital (if needed) - you also don't suffer the sleep deprivation this way

--figure out what are priority items to introduce. If your child will be going in to care, what are the common foods/arts and craft items? Even if you don't plan to feed your child the same foods, knowing how he'll respond to what is in his daily environment is a bonus

--keep a journal of what you introduce, when and record any symptoms, even minor ones

--abide by the 'one new food a week' or few days anyway to increase your odds of knowing what your child reacts to, should he react

--don't give in to that adorable baby face when your child wants more of a new food. Stick with small amounts and gradually increase it. My DD's first ana reaction was to a minuscule amount of sesame. I shudder to think what would have happened had she had more, especially as we didn't have epis at that time

--get family on board. well meaning rellies may decide to give him that ice cream cone topped with nuts early, thinking that you are being over board in your concern

Good luck and keep us posted. I hope that he is and remains allergy free!

_________________
renie
daughter: ana for egg, sesame, dairy, pistachio/cashew/hazelnut. on contact. allergic+ to soy protein isolate, environmental allergies (e.g. dogs, dust mites). asthma. eczema.
son: peanuts, tree-nuts, OAS, environmental allergies. asthma.


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