You are viewing Allergic Living Canada | Switch to United States

Talking Allergies

* FAQ    * Search
* Login   * Register
It is currently Sat Apr 19, 2014 3:04 am

All times are UTC - 4 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Consumer Health Article
PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2007 7:24 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:15 pm
Posts: 365
Location: Regina, Sask
This is interesting:

http://www.consumerhealth.org/articles/ ... 1005222648


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2007 7:35 am 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6429
Location: Ottawa
Quote:
MILK ALLERGIES
Many people, particularly our children, cannot tolerate the stuff that we are calling milk that is sold in the grocery shelves. And you can see why. It starts with cows in confinement, cows fed feed that cows are not designed to digest, and then it goes into these factories for dismantlement and then put back together again. But real milk from pasture fed cows which is not pasteurized, processed or homogenized, is becoming more available. People are finding out where to find it, and it is very encouraging.


Whoa!!
Is she trying to say that milk allergies are a result of the cattle feed and the over processing of milk? Might some unsuspecting sole read her article and try milk? :shock:
Is she insinuating that unpasturized milk from happy cows is safe?
She hasn't even touched on what is in the food that causes the allergy. I think she might have meant milk intolerance?

She speaks about a cereal experiment in rats where they were fed a diet of cereal, nutrients and water and they died. She goes on to say you need to add fat to that diet.
This is probably why most of us eat our cereal with milk or a milk alternative (which has a fat content similar to 2% milk).

I couldn't read the article past the milk allergy paragraph.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2007 1:05 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2928
Location: Toronto
Yeah, I see a lot of these kinds of articles when I'm researching for articles. They make me nervous because they seem to be based on conspiracy theory - that big companies and gov't are hoodwinking us and purposely causing us ill health or allergies.

I agree Susan - if you read this and didn't know much about milk allergy, you might think raw milk was the way to go. However, I really hope people don't start experimenting with feeding raw milk to kids even if they aren't milk allergic.

The advocates for raw milk seem to forget that pasteurization came about 1860s because the raw stuff had so much bacteria,, mold, etc. that deadly pathogens could, and would, grow. People got seriously ill, many died from drinking milk before pasteurization became widespread. With the new wave of interest in raw milk, we are seeing more illness again today. http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/2004/504_milk.html

Anybody who goes for the raw stuff should be pretty sure they know who's producing it, and how it's handled.

Also, when it comes to these kinds of articles and books, I honestly don't know how the authors can be so definitive and live with themselves. I saw one book in Chapter's by a so-called expert (an MD) who outright stated he could "cure" allergies through organic diet. I think Susan's right to suggest that, again, what's probably meant is intolerance. But even that's plenty debatable. These "experts" seem so blissfully unaware of the risks people with allergies/intolerances may be taking with their health if they follow this advice.

_________________
Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2007 1:21 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6429
Location: Ottawa
I sent an e-mail strongly suggesting that they edit this article.
I won't hold my breath. :roll:

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2007 12:15 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:15 pm
Posts: 365
Location: Regina, Sask
From my own experience with milk, I would actually be thrilled to be able to find someone (who doesn't live hundreds of miles away) who would be willing to sell me some raw and/or unfortified milk on a regular basis. I grew up drinking milk each and every day. It wasn't until I was in my mid-twenties that I "suddenly" became extremely allergic to milk in addition to my corn allergy. Each time I drank some milk or had it with cereal, etc. I would develop a blistering, bloody rash (to to point where my bath water was blood red). Ok...so, no more milk for me. Years later when I was researching my corn allergy on the computer I came across a site that explained the use of corn oil as the vitamin carrier (A & D) for milk. This got me wondering and I called the dairies in my area and sure enough they all used corn oil in their milk. I was able to beg (since unfortified milk is illegal to buy or sell in Canada) some home-pasteurized (but unfortified) milk off of a local farmer to trial my so-called milk allergy. I had absolutely no reaction to his milk! My allergist at the time explained how I could heat raw milk and make it safe for my own use.

I still get angry and upset that I cannot have milk (or most other dairy) because it is contaminated with corn. I don't have the time or the energy to find a constant source of unfortified milk so I just use unfortified goat's milk which is readily available in my grocery store.

There might be other people out there who believe they are allergic to milk but it may be that (like myself) they are reacting to something added to the milk. A common source for Vitamin D (for use in milk) is sheep lanolin, which in itself is an allergen.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2007 6:20 am 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6429
Location: Ottawa
Corn allergies are hard. It is in so much of our food. I can completely understand why you would want to be able to purchase untreated milk.
I still think the article is misleading and that was my concern but I can see how you found it hopeful.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2007 9:07 am 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2928
Location: Toronto
I did not know they used corn in a significant level in processed milk. Huh.
That's awful about your reactions - I'm glad you figured it out.

Still, I'd be really careful around the unpasteurized stuff. As this author even says:

Quote:
The largest milk poisoning in American history occurred in 1985 where more than 5,000 people across three states were sickened after a "pasteurization failure" at an Illinois bottling plant. So when something goes wrong with milk from these big plants, it is pretty catastrophic.

_________________
Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 11:50 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
I haven't read the article Eldi mentioned (am trying to catch up on posts!), but I'm interested in the unpasteurized milk issue. After a farmer was in major trouble for selling unpasteurized milk, I recall someone tried to reopen the question of whether unpasteurized milk should be allowed to be sold (in Ontario/Canada? don't recall). When he started selling unpasteurized milk, he alerted the government to what he was doing because he wanted to draw attention to the issue. I think they just turned a blind eye but then one day they decided to take action.

This farmer claimed that unpasteurized milk *can* be safe in a very sanitary modern farm where cows aren't milked by hand. He wanted the government to test unpasteurized milk to see if his claims are validated and if so he wanted to see it regulated. I have no idea what I think about this . . . I would have been interested in further testing.

I think the argument for unpasteurized milk is that it contains enzymes which are destroyed in the pasteurization process and somehow make it less likely that the immune system will go into allergic mode (in the same way that "good bacteria" like that in yogurt might have a protective function). So unpasteurized milk wouldn't be protective against milk allergy in particular . . but atopic disease in general . . or so the theory goes.

I'm fairly certain I saw something on the allergic living website (i.e. not on the forum) supporting this view? Maybe in the section with the blurbs on new research, etc. I can't find it now.

I'm keeping an open mind on the issue. I wouldn't drink unpasteurized milk now, but I would like to see the gov't investigate its safety (seeing as farming methods have changed.)

[edited to add: I hope the above makes sense. I can ramble when I'm tired!]


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2007 3:01 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:15 pm
Posts: 365
Location: Regina, Sask
I recently checked with the dairies in my area and they are still using corn oil as the vitamin carrier (Vitamin A & D) in their milk. It's not that I hate goat's milk, but I wish I could drink cow's milk again...sigh...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 29, 2008 2:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:15 pm
Posts: 365
Location: Regina, Sask
During my on-going research about corn allergy I came across this site that explains the use of corn oil and other corn derivatives in fortified milk. Someone once told me that they put anti-freeze into milk and I was sure they were wrong. This site, however, confirms the use of "propylene glycol" (anti-freeze) as one of the components of the vitamin carrier for some milk. Either way...water or oil based vitamins...there is still corn in your milk...(propylene glycol is made from corn).

Polysorbate 80 is also made from corn. It's no wonder I was having such horrendous reactions to milk!

http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/54806 ... ption.html


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 01, 2008 1:31 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
That must be so incredibly frustrating to not be able to consume something like milk simply because it contains another allergen that it doesn't absolutely have to contain... I have a lot of sympathy for your situation.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 4 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group