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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 6:24 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2007 5:58 pm
Posts: 14
Location: Moncton, NB, Canada
Hi, I am new to this forum, although I have been reading the topics for a few weeks. What a fantastic resource ! I live in Atlantic Canada and have not found any allergy support groups (although I have found a couple of great friends whose kids have allergies too).

My daughter is starting Kindergarten in the Fall (slightly stressed) and I have done as much research and work with the school as I can and feel confident that she will be in good hands.

My question is what kinds of epi-pen carriers do people use on their young children? She will have an epi in her backpack and of course the school office will have her meds too. However, I feel better if I can send her with a fanny pack so that her epi and puffer are on her especially when they leave the classroom for gym class or recess. I don't believe the teacher carries the epi's (but I have to double check when school re-opens).

The two sources I have so far is MedicAlert and Kozy Epi. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated !

Thanks !

_________________
Michelle
Daughter (5 yrs) - ana to milk, nuts, peanut, egg, sesame; intolerant of beef; seasonal allergies; asthma
Husband - IBS - several food intolerances
Me - Asthma, some seasonal allergies


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 9:21 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6456
Location: Ottawa
It sounds as though you have done everything you can to be sure all goes well.
We have our daughter use an Epi-Pen belt with a single Epi-Pen in it. She also carries, in her backpack, the fannypack that contains 2 more Epi-Pens, her asthma medications and her aerochamber. It also contains her health card, vacination information, contact #'s etc.
I feel that it's important to have an Epi-Pen on her for immediate access, but the asthma medication can stay in her backpack, in her cubby.

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Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject: epi-pen carrier
PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 9:23 pm 
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Joined: Sun Feb 04, 2007 3:23 pm
Posts: 28
Location: Barrhaven
I just ordered one from Livalittle.ca. The price is about $15 + tax and shipping. I


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 9:40 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
I like the E-Belt for my guys, but for little girls I know it is a bit "macho", given that it's black. I have heard good things about KozyEpi - the one I saw at a recent support group meeting looked really cute, not too bulky, and made of neoprene, I think, so quite durable and water resistant. The parents were happy with it.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 8:29 am 
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Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2007 5:58 pm
Posts: 14
Location: Moncton, NB, Canada
Wow, what a quick response . . . thanks for all your helpful ideas !

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Michelle
Daughter (5 yrs) - ana to milk, nuts, peanut, egg, sesame; intolerant of beef; seasonal allergies; asthma
Husband - IBS - several food intolerances
Me - Asthma, some seasonal allergies


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 9:19 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
My son has been wearing an e-belt since kindergarten. It's the only one I really like for kids, because it can withstand a lot of abuse -- like running full force into the playscape. He once fell off the playscape (about 4 - 5 feet) and although he had a bit of a bruise from the e-belt, I hate to imagine what would have happened if he'd landed on the epi-pen in a flimsy carrier.

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self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 8:29 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 687
Location: Cobourg, ON
My daughter's teacher wore her epipen in JK when they left the room. Aside from that it hung on a hook beside the door (high out of the reach of little ones). In SK, the school started sending all of the SK's out for regular recesses, so we knew it was time for her to start wearing it herself. We bought a kozyepi and she used that for most of the year and then an ebelt. We were happy with both. The ebelt fits under dresses and shirts better. She likes to tuck it in and we support her. All of the staff know that she has an epipen on, so keeping it underneath her clothes is ok.

Just a word of caution about keeping epipens in backpacks. At my school last year, the staff discussed this issue. We decided that we did not want epipens in backpacks. In an emergency, if someone other than the classroom teacher was sent to the classroom to find the backup epipen - would they be able to find the right classroom? (remember supply teachers) Would they be able to find the right backpack? (take a look at the mess and clutter in some cloakrooms) We decided that all epipens not worn would be kept in one central location so that there would not be any confusion in an emergency.

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13 year old daughter -- lives with life-threatening allergies to milk, tree nuts and peanuts; seasonal allergies (birch, maple, ragweed); pet allergies; asthma; and eczema
10 year old son - no allergies


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2007 9:42 am 
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Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2007 5:58 pm
Posts: 14
Location: Moncton, NB, Canada
Thanks for the info on what you do, Katec. It's hard to know what to do sometimes. I hear conflicting stories, some people tell me that young children should not wear epi-pens because if they do not know how to administer it to themselves, then they should not wear a belt.

My argument always was that they need it on them so someone else can grab it and administer it in an emergency. I know that people worry the kids will play with them, but I disagree. I think our kids had to grow up a little to early with having to deal with their allergies . . . at least I know my 5-year old daughter knows that epi's are not a toy and she would never let other kids touch or play with them.

Besides, I know 12-year olds who would not administer their own epi's in an emergency, for their fear of needles. My thoughts have always been that if the epi is on them, then in an emergency anaphylaxis situation, the epi is within easy reach for a caregiver to administer.

I kind of chuckle at parents with non-allergic children who are all freaked out with sending their child to school . . . if only they knew the daily apprenhension and stress we parents go through !!

_________________
Michelle
Daughter (5 yrs) - ana to milk, nuts, peanut, egg, sesame; intolerant of beef; seasonal allergies; asthma
Husband - IBS - several food intolerances
Me - Asthma, some seasonal allergies


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2007 9:48 am 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2945
Location: Toronto
You said it Michelle, and welcome to the Forum.

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Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2007 11:51 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
As an adult with allergies, I hope I never have to self-administer. I know that when I went to the hospital in ana. shock, I would not have been capable of it. At that time I was not carrying an epi-pen, but even if I had one with me I would have needed someone else to administer it.

People need to keep in mind that in an anaphylactic reaction you are having difficulty breathing, or your blood pressure is dropping. Both of those things will affect your thinking ability. It will probably also affect your fine-motor control.

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2007 9:50 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
I agree with AM - no one who is experiencing anaphylaxis should be expected to self-administer.

See Key Recommendations - item 6 - from Allergy Safe Communities.

I am a firm believer in kids wearing their own EpiPens/Twinjects. My kids have worn theirs (with an EBelt) since they were about 4 years old. That way it is always with them in an emergency for a responsible adult to grab.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


Last edited by KarenOASG on Thu Aug 09, 2007 3:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2007 11:18 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
Karen, you may find this a bit amusing. When my son started school I went in to the office prepared to fight for his right to have his epi-pen in his classroom -- not in the office. I wanted the teacher to keep it in her desk. The secretary hemmed and hawed, and finally said OK, but only on a temporary basis as he really should be taught to be responsible for carrying it himself. My response was "BUT he's only 4". And she said, they didn't expect him to self-administer, but he needs it with him at all times.

I panicked at the whole idea -- spoke to some people on an allergy web-site who told me how lucky I was. :lol: Now, I wouldn't have it any other way. I would not allow him into a school where he is not allowed to carry it himself.

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2007 3:16 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
I know - it's all a matter of perspective, isn't it? :)

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2007 3:50 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2945
Location: Toronto
AM, I've had to self-administer once.

It sounds strange to say, but I'm glad I was 'with it' enough to able to. It got me completely over the fear of doing so. If I need to do it again, I wouldn't hesitate.

And also, I was alone. Talked to my sister by phone,in case I didn't improve. (At which point, she was to call 911.) I also remembered Laurie Harada's sage advice: unlock the front door in case paramedics have to come in. I improved quickly after the shot – other than the fact that my sister decided to walk me (windily) through her work travails. I guess she felt, "but enough about you". :roll:

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Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 10:54 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
I'm not afraid to self-administer -- I'm only afraid I either won't be able to, or possibly won't even realize I need to.

My son's first reaction we were about an hour from the hospital with no phone. He was only 2 1/2 years old. I sat in the back of the car with him, and my adult epi-pen in my hand. My husband was driving and screaming that I couldn't use that on him -- he's to small. All I kept replying is "what's the alternative.....I know what happens with none, so I'll take my chances with to much". My son's reaction was NOT anaphylactic so I didn't need to use it. But, even though it was an adult one, I was not afraid to.

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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