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 Post subject: Labelling and dairy
PostPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2007 5:38 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2948
Location: Toronto
I'll be at an international food allergy conference in Montreal next week. There will be food industry and gov't people there. One of the topics is food labelling - and I know the gov't officials will say that the much delayed new regs. "are coming". (These include plain English terms - no more casein, albumin.. and ingreds. of ingreds.)

It strikes me that the dairy allergic must be one of the groups most affected by less than clear labelling.

So I thought I could pass on the sense of how real people are affected:
- how big an issue does that remain for you?
- What difference would plain English make in your life?
- Have you heard of mistakes being made by relatives, friends who think lactose-free means dairy-free?

thanks, Gwen

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Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2007 8:04 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6471
Location: Ottawa
Two things.

1. It is a huge issue. Many dairy-free cheeses are made for those who are lactose intolerant. Family and friends who want to provide safe foods aften get it wrong.
Lactate and lactulose are not OK but stearyl-lactate is Ok? Never mind the "natural ingredients" what are they? My daughter was given LifeSavers in a loot bag today and they said natural flavours. Had they been fruit flavours I probably would have given them to her but as it was Butter Rum flavour I wouldn't dare.

2. When can we expect to see ingredients listed on medication? Dairy is used in some pills. Currently it seems that manufacturers only need to list the active ingredients.
An anaphylaxis reaction can occur when the protein enteres the blood stream and this can be eaten, drank, inhaled or absorbed by the skin.
Certain asthma medications contain milk ingredients. Those who have food allergies and asthma are at greater risk of an anphylaxis reaction as they already have a compromised airway.
I really feel that we are at risk with the current situation. If I ask a pharmacist about the ingredients in a medication they can not answer me.
This is just wrong.

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 28, 2007 2:25 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
Labelling for dairy is very poor...and very frustrating. We eat very few prepackaged foods due to the fact that lots have incomprehensable labelling. We phone about every product before giving it to my daughter. Some companies are better than others...but many are just careless (unclear labelling, very likely cross contamination etc.). And medication is a HUGE issue. Luckily, my daughter has used very few. Pharmacists don't always know what's in there...neither does the prescribing physician...or the dentist in their polishing creams, floride treatmenst etc.

_________________
DD age 9 1/2 -peanuts, nuts,
DD age 7 1/2 - milk, eggs, chicken, peanuts, treenuts, cats, dogs,
DS age 2 1/2
Husband- asthma, eggs, treenuts, fish, shellfish environmental
Self - penicillan, eurithromiacin, mild laytex allergy.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 10:16 am 
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Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 9:01 pm
Posts: 69
Location: Ontario, Canada
The first thing is I wouldn't have to carry the 9 point font page and a half of possible dairy ingredients with me every time I went shopping. I guess I'd still carry it but not have it in hand.

Otherwise I agree with what others have already posted. Dairy is in so many things that it's hard to know what's safe.

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Jan, mom to 3 boys
DS#3 - eggs, cats, dust, eczema, avoiding nuts as a precaution
DS#2 - seasonal allergies
DS#1 - no allergies
Me & DH - seasonal allergies


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 1:00 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 9:25 pm
Posts: 238
Location: Thornhill
Yes the labelling could be vastly improved.

Still, I avidly avoid and call the company first to understand their labelling policy and cross contam risks since dd is ana on contact.

Why would I love clear labelling? Not for ME who presently shops FOR her but FOR HER so that she can start reading labels at a young age - we're all about teaching responsibility - is it even close to reasonable to expect any child to "get" all the alternative labels?!?!

I agree on re: pharmaceuticals since there is often dairy and egg. Pharmacists seem to have the info but I would love to have it in black and white on packages. Same for "cosmetics".

Other thing for the ultra sensitive which gets off topic but ... cross contamination is a HUGE concern. Example, it is more of an issue for me to have that info vs. "plain english" labelling. Think of chips and foods like that - the flavouring is often powdered. Even if production lines are dedicated (non-dairy, dairy), they may be packaged in the same area or ingredients stored in the same area posing a substantial risk. Since many companies don't use "may contain" and many companies don't seem to divulge this information easily, the severe dairy allergic are further restricted...

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renie
daughter: ana for egg, sesame, dairy, pistachio/cashew/hazelnut. on contact. allergic+ to soy protein isolate, environmental allergies (e.g. dogs, dust mites). asthma. eczema.
son: peanuts, tree-nuts, OAS, environmental allergies. asthma.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2007 3:23 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6471
Location: Ottawa
Another thing that bothers me about milk allergy and labels is that caramel can be either milk or sugar derived yet it doesn't need to be specific? Lecithin has to indicate either soy or egg lecithin...why not caramel?

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Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 06, 2007 7:33 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2948
Location: Toronto
Thanks everyone - useful points.

Susan, I didn't know that about caramel. It should be affected by the new regs when they pass. May have to check that specific example with Health Canada to be sure.

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Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2007 9:03 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 9:25 pm
Posts: 238
Location: Thornhill
Gwen - forgive me if you have posted elsewhere or if it is coming in an issue of AL but any great findings (or frustrations) from the conference you can share?

_________________
renie
daughter: ana for egg, sesame, dairy, pistachio/cashew/hazelnut. on contact. allergic+ to soy protein isolate, environmental allergies (e.g. dogs, dust mites). asthma. eczema.
son: peanuts, tree-nuts, OAS, environmental allergies. asthma.


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