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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2007 12:02 am 
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Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 8:55 pm
Posts: 412
Location: Vancouver, BC
I am not a lawyer, and my brain doesn't work like one, so I might not be correct, but I think that the guideline's message is that school staff have a duty to respond to the best of their ability, keeping in mind that they are not trained medical professionals.

I would much rather in my son's school that school staff be trained to administer the simpler device well, rather than having to learn how to administer different 2 devices. I also hope that schools insist on one auto-injector TO BE WORN ON THE CHILD'S BODY, because that is something that has been proven to save lives, but maybe a creative solution could be thought of for the 2nd dose, such as all the parents could agree to buy a second one together to have on hand if need be, or maybe one parent with an excellent health plan could write a waiver that they do not mind if their 2nd dose gets used in case of emergency.

I find it strange that any parent would use cost as a reason to deprive their child access to life saving medication. I know many teachers who are worrying on a daily basis while the parent makes excuses. I think many people are unaware of "best practices" regarding anaphylaxis, and they do not "get it". We need to do more to get good information to all parents. Children with anaphylaxis have a right to medication that will save their lives, if parents cannot provide it, it needs to be provided by some other body, but what should not be negotiable is the child's right to it. They also need to be wearing it. It should not be in an office or in a teacher's drawer, a mother's purse or a locker. I think that a child is most likely to have a reaction on the playground, after they have eaten their snacks or lunch, or where insects are. It would take many minutes to get medication to a kid in this case.

If both products were allowed in schools, I would ask the teacher what they are most comfortable with, and then provide it. For myself, I will go with whichever is simpler.

There have been cases where the Epipen has been administered incorrectly, there was one case where a little guy in Australia died as a result.

I once mistook the real thing for a trainer and gave myself a shot - it was very funny and embarrassing! (But it hardly hurt at all, and it was good, cos my kid was always scared that it would hurt and I was able to tell him that it didn't at all! And I was really jittery for about 20 minutes, and then I was fine, except for my pride!) So you see why I need to go with the simpler device!


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 10:34 am 
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Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 8:55 pm
Posts: 412
Location: Vancouver, BC
Here is a sample of a newsletter in a BC school that someone sent me. I don't know what it is like in all schools, but at this school they are not saying "no" to twinjets, just that it would need to let the teacher know. I talked to an allergist and apparently the problem is that they have to figure out the risk of contracting Hep C from an injection, and take that into account. The allergist was really fighting to have Twinjet included, so that parents could just provide 1 Twinjet, rather than 2 Epipens.

I once asked the pharmacist and the doctor (not an allergist) if I could just buy 1 Epipen for the house, and then a vial of adreneline and a needle for if a second dose was required. The adreneline in a vial is very cheap about $3. I figured that I could give a first shot with an Epipen, then I would have some time to get the injection ready, so I could manage it. They said no, but when Aaron was a baby they gave me some this way (but I tried to do it and it was not easy, and I was freaked out at the thought of having to do it in an emergency. I would have needed to practice, so I just got an Epipen jr.)

Here is the newsletter sample:

Life threatening Allergies

A REMINDER TO ALL PARENTS

Within our school community there are several students who have a potentially life-threatening allergy (anaphylaxis) to foods, predominately to peanuts and or other nuts. (Is there other foods that need to be mentioned?)

In order to reduce the risk of accidental exposure or cross contamination to these students, we respectfully ask for the co-operation of parents/guardians within this school community to please avoid sending peanut butter, or products with peanuts or nuts listed in the ingredients, to school.

In a classroom setting, cross-contamination is the greatest risk for this type of allergy. Cross-contamination is when a product from one child’s snack comes into contact with an allergic child or their snack. Even a trace amount can kill.

We realize that it is difficult at the best of times to get children to eat healthy snacks. However, we hope you will appreciate the seriousness of this condition and that you will assist us in our efforts to create a safe environment at school and on fieldtrips for all our students. With your co-operation we can minimize the risk of an allergic reaction.

TO THE PARENTS OF ANAPHYLACTIC CHILDREN

The EpiPen Auto-Injector is the recommended product for safe and effective administration of adrenalin in the school setting (if you are planning to use a Twinject, this needs to be discussed with the classroom teacher).

Please ensure that the school staff receives an up-to-date medical plan for your child and that any medication(s) have not expired. Some providers of epinephrine provide an e-mail expiry date reminder service free of charge.

It is recommended that all severely allergic students have a second or third EpiPen at the school, in case it is needed.

It is also recommended that your child carry their EpiPen/asthma medications on them at all times.

For more information on allergies and anaphylaxis please do not hesitate to contact the school


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