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 Post subject: Airplane food
PostPosted: Thu Feb 24, 2005 12:53 am 
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Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2005 7:19 pm
Posts: 207
Location: Halifax
... do you even bother? Do you trust the airlines to be accurate about what they're serving?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:49 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:10 pm
Posts: 121
Location: Charlottesville, VA
I don't trust them. United will try to accomodate, but only to a limit, and only on transcontinental flights. Recently, I ordered a Hindu vegetarian meal, hoping I'd get something soy-free and wheat-free. My travel agent also put my specifications into the reservation. The entree came without any ingredient listing and the sides were not safe.

I always carry food with me. We have to do so, anyhow, because my hubby is hypoglycemic and can't tolerate sugar or refined grains.

I also wipe down my seat and tray with wet wipes. I put a blanket or coat down to protect me more. The last time I forgot to do this, I spent most of the flight covered in hives and hoping I wouldn't need epinephrine. The in-flight snack was peanut-free, but contained roasted soybeans--I'm severely allergic and the residue was enough to make me react. I'm glad I don't have airborne reactions to that stuff. :/

ygg


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2005 12:59 pm 
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Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2005 7:19 pm
Posts: 207
Location: Halifax
Do you think airlines used to be better about this sort of thing?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 23, 2005 11:23 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6501
Location: Ottawa
I'm pretty sure that I read somewhere that airline foods/hospital foods is excempt from labeling laws.
I was traveling one Christmas with dd (then 18months). At the security gate I was asked to drink from her sippy cup to prove that it was really soya milk. Being distracted as the baggage had already gone through and I was alone with dd (nuf said). I almost took a sip but then realised- I'd had a coffee with milk a short time earlier. :shock: I remembered in time to stop and suggest I offer it to dd.
Boy, it just takes a moment, eh?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 9:40 am 
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Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 7:43 pm
Posts: 58
Location: nova scotia
Everyone is human and therefore a mistake can be made and flying in the air is nowhere for an accident to happen. I would not let my son eat any of the airplane food no matter what they told me. I would bring his own and still let the authorities know that there is a child flying with a severe peanut allergy even though he would not be eating any of their food. This is a time when you (not the stewardous) have to be 100% sure because even though you have an epi-pen or two, you will not be be able to get to a hospital any time soon. I have found that some people who are not around people with allergies do not take it as serious even though they may try their best to accomadate you.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2005 7:10 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 8:06 pm
Posts: 8
Location: Toronto
I am thinking of taking my son to Jamaica to vist his grandfather. He is allergic to lentils, peanuts, treenuts, sesame and sunfloer seeds. Has anyone been on a 31/2 to 4 hour flight with an allergic child. What do the airlines require for travel? What about going through security with a multitude of Epipens?

darkver


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 Post subject: Travelling with Epi-pens
PostPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2005 10:41 pm 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6501
Location: Ottawa
Here is the page from Anaphylaxis Canada:
http://www.anaphylaxis.org/content/livi ... l_safe.asp
I hope you have a great trip!! :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 21, 2005 7:46 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 8:06 pm
Posts: 8
Location: Toronto
Thanks Susan, Great information...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2005 8:52 pm 
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Joined: Fri May 13, 2005 7:31 pm
Posts: 19
Location: Paisley, ON
Hi! I just read your messages about flying. Here's my two cents worth....

I am fortunate enough to be married to a Jazz pilot & have travelled with my son to halifax quite a bit, my son is allergice to peanuts. DON'T TRUST THE FOOD!!!!!!!!!!

And I mean that in the best way possible. We always bring our own food on the plane, & the epi pens are in the gymbag I carry & I have never had a problem. Having said that do not be shy to ask if a seat can be switched if the person next to you opens up something that could pose a problem or let them know. This has happened to us & the guy sitting next to me was accomodating as could be, he opened up a bag of peanuts!

My dh has never seen any allergic reactions on any of his flights but when you are that high up in the air safety is #1. It could take over 20 min to land safely & that may be too long . I don't say this to scare you but having gone thru the motions I know the risks and like I said before we have never had a problem.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2005 7:29 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 6:48 pm
Posts: 614
Location: Ontario, Canada / Cambridge, UK
I agree. Don't trust them. My son's first flight abroad was with Air Canada for a flight from Toronto to London, England. When we booked the flight we made sure to mention his allergy to nuts and peanuts and made a point of ordering the fruit plate for his meal (it was the least likely to have nuts, so we thought). It seems no one remembered his allergy because the fruit plate they served him had a bowl of almonds in the middle! We were shocked!

I'm glad to see that the latest issue of Allergic Living has some very useful info for eating in the plane. I now see that the only option is to bring your own food.


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 Post subject: flying in a week
PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2005 11:33 am 
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Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2005 11:27 am
Posts: 1
I am always terrified that something is going to happen to my boyfriend who had Anaphylaxis to tree nuts and fish and shellfish. I am flying Toronto to London and ordered him the fruit plate but I always bring a whole bag of food for him to eat.....


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2005 1:04 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 6:48 pm
Posts: 614
Location: Ontario, Canada / Cambridge, UK
missyli, I'd reconsider the fruit plate that Air Canada serves. The bowl of almonds did come with some "saran wrap" wrapped over it... but I'd still be concerned about cross-contamination. Have your boyfriend eat his own food. That's the safest option. What I'd also do (after having read the useful article in Allergic Living) is ask the airline to make it a peanut-nut-free flight and also request that he not be seated next to anyone else (except you, if you are going)... but on the seats on the sides of the plane... not in the middle.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2005 4:42 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
I haven't had much experience with planes---partly because I feel safer travelling by car or train if at all possible. But I'm not going to be able to avoid air travel for the rest of my life. Has anyone had a good experience with asking airlines to make flights nut free? Are most airlines willing to do that?

One of my sisters has had a lot of experience travelling internationally. At first she tried to get allergen free meals, but after awhile she concluded it was not safe. On one occasion they didn't manage to get the meal on board. On another occasion, they tried to serve her seafood--it seems like multiple allergens just blow their computer system.

Another comment on travel---this is just anecdotal, but my sister has known a few people who have developed allergies after living overseas in very polluted urban areas. There might be a cause and effect there. And I have a friend from a large, polluted city who gets migraine headaches and is ill the whole time that she is visiting back home. She thinks that she used to be adjusted to living in a polluted environment but now that she has been away for a number of years it bothers her.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 15, 2005 8:53 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 28, 2005 10:13 pm
Posts: 8
We travel quite a bit with our PA son (3 1/2 yrs) My husband works for Westjet so we fly a lot too and yes, it is always terrifying. You can notify when you book but I alway pack his snacks. WJ no longer serves peanuts - I did get after them for serving almonds and so far (keep your fingers crossed!) they haven't returned to serving them. It took MANY emails and never saying, I guess that will have to do, but it seems to have sunk in. I'm sure I'm not the only one who wrote to WJ. LIke they say, the squeaky wheel... Anyhow, keep after those airlines! Maybe it helps to point out that nuts are more expensive than pretzels, cookies etc. WJ still will not 'guarantee' a nut free flight as they cannot control what others eat, but it's risk management. One or two people eating peanut butter sandwiches over a period of a longer flight versus 80-100 people opening up bags of nuts all at once greatly decreases the risk of someone having a reaction. The other thing that will help is IF you or someone travelling does have a reaction - even the most minor that is controlled with Benedryl - bring it to the attention of the in flight crew - they have to make a report. Most of the minor reactions aren't documented and therefore the airline industry doesn't get the seriousness of the issue. SO LET"S ALL BE SQUEAKY!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2005 4:38 am 
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Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 6:48 pm
Posts: 614
Location: Ontario, Canada / Cambridge, UK
I just flew with Air Canada last week. They served almonds on the flight to the UK and the list of ingredients on the bag stated "may contain traces of peanuts". I haven't been too happy with my experiences with Air Canada when it comes to peanuts and nuts on their flights. I'm not allergic but my son is (he wasn't with me on the flight) and I'm trying to find an airline that is more responsible/aware of their peanut and nut products. I heard British Airways is better but I've never flown with them personally. Does anyone have any recommendations on airlines that fly to the UK?


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