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 Post subject: Peers educating peers?
PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 5:07 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 07, 2006 6:40 am
Posts: 50
Location: Victoria
I just logged on to pose a question similar to newpeanutkids but thought I should start a separate thread so not to derail hers.

My daughter and her friend having been thinking of proposing that they create a bulletin board or some other way to educate students themselves about the seriousness of anaphylaxis. They're wondering what others think middle school students need to know and what the best way to share that information might be.

If anyone has any suggestions it would be great as neither girl really know where to start and they want to get the most bang for buck out of their presentation. They're thinking of making a bulletin board or putting together a video or ???? They're not to keen on giving the presentation themselves but if they can use some form of media to do it they'd feel more comfortable. My daughter is suddenly not wearing her epipen and feeling bad because other students aren't understanding why they have to wash their hands after they eat, etc. I'm sure they've been told but...it would be good if there was a better understanding so that her and other anaphylactic kids feel safer.

Thanks in advance for any ideas you might have.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:35 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6481
Location: Ottawa
I understand the aversion to bringing too much attention to themselves. Here are a few ideas of what can be done. They can do most of this discreetly with the school administrations approval. They may get bolder as they get empowered. Ask them to chack and see if they can get extra credit for any of this. Could they get a local allergy support group to sign off on the time used as community volunteerism?
Would they like to get some pamphlets from the government (free) and set up an information corner somewhere in the school?
Would they like to start a mentoring program for new students with food allergies? Do they have a cafeteria? Could they do a food safety audit? They could talk to the food service staff and review the source of the food and determine whether any of the food is safe to eat for the top 8-10 allergens. They could post this information in the caffeteria.
They can get posters from the Ministry of Health explaining the importance of handwashing against nosocomial infections.
They could arrange a mock anaphylaxis drill to see how the school and the student body would respond-ONLY WITH PERMISSION!

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 3:24 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
All the ideas so far are really good, I think. Do the girls have some non-allergic friends who would like to help them out? They might feel less shy if they are working with a slightly bigger group - and it would be a great learning experience for their non-allergic friends.

Something else to check out: the AAIA has some great new posters that are specifically aimed at teens - go to the AAIA products page and scroll down to the "It's a Fact" posters.

They could also try to sell SAFE bracelets from Anaphylaxis Canada to do some fund-raising (sending the funds back to AC), if the school will let the girls do that. Go to the AC products page and scroll down a bit. That could go hand-in-hand with a display. I know that other kids have done that.

K.

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Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2008 2:51 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 07, 2006 6:40 am
Posts: 50
Location: Victoria
These are great ideas, thanks!

Quote:
They could arrange a mock anaphylaxis drill to see how the school and the student body would respond-ONLY WITH PERMISSION!


I'd love it if she would be brave enough to do this but I'm not sure if the school would go for it. It's a small school and the kids aren't all there at the same time so I think she'll want to set something up for kids to look at, possibly have a video for kids to push in and watch and we talked about a quiz to see what kids know about anaphylaxis. That's as far as she'd gotten.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2008 11:20 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Are you aware of the video "Friends Helping Friends: Make It Your Goal"? It's available from Anaphylaxis Canada. It's aimed at teens and is quite good.

Here is the description:

Profiles NHL hockey player Tom Poti, an accomplished archer and a college student studying to become a pharmacist as they live with food allergies. Learn about the challenges faced by food-allergic teens in everyday situations like eating in school cafeterias, ordering in restaurants and going to parties. Time 17:00

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Might be worth checking out if that's kind of thing they want in their display.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2008 3:49 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 8:55 pm
Posts: 412
Location: Vancouver, BC
One thing I would suggest, too, is working with the school nurse. Our school had a great school nurse last year and she worked with my son's grade 4 teacher to teach his whole class. My son did not want to get up and talk, or have any attention drawn to himself personally, but he also felt totally supported within that classroom and was very appreciative of both his teacher and the nurse (as was his mom!). He was SO happy that they cared enough about him to think of doing it anyway. And it made our whole family feel so much better when he went to birthday parties, playdates, cos we knew that even if other parents did not "get it", his friends sure did. His best friend told me afterwards, "You don't have to worry, cos I would give Aaron the Epipen if anything happened." Not to say that I would expect a nine-year old to administer, or put pressure on a kid, but kids can be heroes too, and I am all for empowering kids.

If you get the involvement of a health care professional, it will give your daugther some support (and the whole school staff should be thrilled that she shows such initiative) and it will give her more ability to be flexible, maybe she can do posters and visuals and the nurse can do the actual talking part, or whatever your daughter is not comfortable doing. Plus, it will show public health in your area that there is a need for that sort of thing in the middle schools, and maybe provide BC with a model that others could copy.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 11:26 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 07, 2006 6:40 am
Posts: 50
Location: Victoria
Thanks everyone for all the great ideas. We're just sitting down tonight to talk more about formulating all the ideas together. My daughter and her friend attend a DL program that has some onsite classes, these class times are the times that are presenting a risk and it seems students aren't "getting it" and it seems that teachers end are ending up policing the students. Our assumption is that the teachers are going to a lot of work but because the students don't comprehend it's almost fruitless effort. My thought is that the understanding and learning needs to be at their level and they need to be involved in the process.

Thank you again for all of your great ideas. They've certainly given the girls a good head start.

:D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2008 10:19 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6481
Location: Ottawa
What is a DL program?

Why don't you check out Anaphylaxis Canada's Safe4Kids website?
They have downloadable lesson plans and activities for all grades Kindergarten to 10+?
http://www.safe4kids.ca/content/schools/schools.asp

A product that I have found efective for teaching about handwashing is GloGerm. It is very visual and shows how germs are spread.
http://www.glogerm.com/

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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