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PostPosted: Mon Sep 01, 2008 5:46 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 10:55 am
Posts: 29
Location: Newmarket
Can anyone tell me where I can find a sample/ideas for an individual plan for a multiple food allergic child. Our school has an emergency plan for our daughter who is ana to Eggs, Shrimp, Oats, Peanuts and Treenuts. But we have no individual plan for her. The Superintendent thinks that she only needs a emergency plan. Any help would be greatly appreciated. The principal looks to the Superintendent for direction.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 01, 2008 10:07 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 687
Location: Cobourg, ON
Sabrina's law requires risk reduction strategies in place in addition to emergency plans. For my daughter, we have asked for the following routines/ strategies in place:
- all students in class wash hands after eating
- all desks are washed after snacks and lunch - with the help of older students
- students stay in their own seats for meals/snacks
- my daughter washes her hands prior to eating
- students in class are taught about allergies
- student scissors are not used to open food packages during meals/snacks - teacher designates one pair to be used by non-allergic students for this purpose
- our daughter only eats food provided by or approved by parents
- non-food rewards used in class
I think that is our entire list.
The new document, Anaphylaxis in Schools and Other Settings, which is in every school in Ontario has a large section on risk reduction strategies. Most of this document is found at www.allergysafecommunities.ca
Good luck,
Kate

_________________
13 year old daughter -- lives with life-threatening allergies to milk, tree nuts and peanuts; seasonal allergies (birch, maple, ragweed); pet allergies; asthma; and eczema
10 year old son - no allergies


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2008 6:18 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6456
Location: Ottawa
Our plan also includes students eat lunch in their homerooms there is no eating inthe Computer labs, Music room, French rooms or the gymnasium.

There is a safe table in the classroom where our daughter is to eat and those with lunches qwhich don't include her allergens are invited to eat with her. This table is supposed to recieve extra attention from the custodial staff.

Our school has done away with Pizza Day as the risk or exposure to dairy products that afternoon is too high. Students are allowed to bring a piece of pizza for lunch though as the risk from one student les severe.

Students are encouraged to wash their hands but...I don't think it's enforced. (Something I'm working on this year)

There is a note sent how requesting that peanut and tree nut products not be sent to school but I don't think there is a ban. Parents are not advised of special brands to purchase or avoid.

Our daughter has a treats container in the classroom to which she can go when there is a special food treat handed out.

Allergens are concidered when creating the lesson plan and teachers call to discuss the possible concerns.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2008 9:14 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 10:55 am
Posts: 29
Location: Newmarket
Thank you Kate and Susan for your replies.

It gives me some great ideas to have on our daugters individual plan. It was also very helpful to hear from families that have other food allergies other then just peanut.

Many of these items we have asked the school for but they have not been formally written.

I am very lucky our daughter is able to come home for lunch everyday so that at least helps us out some.

I was so happy today when my daughter came home and said the teacher had the kids wash their hands!! Hopefully this will last throughout the year.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2008 6:30 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6456
Location: Ottawa
If you have a teacher who is making them wash their hands, you've got a great teacher there!

http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/chn-rcs/handwash-eng.php

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2008 9:54 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 31, 2008 9:15 am
Posts: 7
Location: Mississauga ON
I concur!

It's the one thing that I would like to see more of - handwashing that is - that isn't happening enough yet at our school.

My son's teacher in Grade 5 this year took out Daniel's epipen yesterday to show the class and explained how to use it and what kind of symptoms Daniel (plus another boy in his class has the same allergy plus shellfish) might be experiencing. And the importance of finding a teacher and telling them to call 911. And the importance of not bringing food with nuts or peanuts into the classroom. I think he did a great job - I hadn't even asked him to do that.

The importance of peers being knowledgable of the situation and what to do if a reaction occurs (or if my son is just "not right") in the playground is so important, I believe.

_________________
mom to 3
son, 10: anaphylactic to tree nuts, asthma
daughter, 7 : skin reaction to all adhesives on bandages, even paper tape, asthma
daughter, 3: no known allergies but haven't tried the tree
nuts yet.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2008 9:42 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
Does everyone have an individual plan since Sabrina's Law was passed? I don't. The school policy regarding anaphylaxis includes everything I would have asked for. Several years ago I had a problem and booked a meeting with the principal. I explained the problem and what I would like done about it in future -- she said it was a great idea and would now become school policy for all students with emergency meds.

I fear when we change schools, I'm going to suddenly have to fight for everything. I wonder if I can get a copy of the school policy to bring with me -- to show what I had and what I want.

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2008 11:32 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 31, 2008 9:15 am
Posts: 7
Location: Mississauga ON
Hi,

When we're discussing individual plans, are we referring to the Anaphylaxis Emergency Form that is posted throughout the school describing each student's specific allergies/precautions to be taken/symptoms of anaphylaxis and action protocol if a reaction takes place?

Every year I speak with my son's teacher about what his allergy is, what his reactions have looked like in the past and the importance of Daniel only eating his own food and encouraging others to not bring foods with nuts into the class. And of course reiterate many times that please, please administer an epipen even if you are in doubt. I tell them that I would never be upset if they were wrong - I would be grateful.

Once I knew (and then the school realized) that Sabrina's Law was coming into reality, I worked with the principal collaboratively to ensure the forms/letters home to parents, etc, were clear, concise and to the point. The package our school board came out with originally was not the best and due to my good relationship with my principal (I always mention that we need to be working on a safer environment for the entire school community, not just my son), he allowed me fairly free rein to redo it without changing the context of it all.

I think each family needs to take responsbility to meet with their child's specific teacher each year and go through the same spiel that we do every year. And yes, each student should have an individual plan and yes, that plan might include different precautions depending on the type of allergy and age of the student. We need to just remember we are working as a team with our schools - they, for the most part, don't want anything to happen to a student and will take any reasonable precaution possible to avoid it. But then again, we need to remember we are all humans - things we don't like will happen. We just need to keep addressing them in a positive, helpful way.

That's enough from me.

_________________
mom to 3
son, 10: anaphylactic to tree nuts, asthma
daughter, 7 : skin reaction to all adhesives on bandages, even paper tape, asthma
daughter, 3: no known allergies but haven't tried the tree
nuts yet.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2008 6:33 am 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6456
Location: Ottawa
Yes, it sounds like the medication and emergency contact information, the signs which identify our children and their allergens as well as the storage of their auto-injectors is the individual plan. Basically anything that is specifically geared to the student.
Here are the definitions of the board created policy and the individual plan:

Quote:
Establishment of policy 2. (1) Every board shall establish and maintain an anaphylactic policy in accordance with this section.
Contents of anaphylactic policy
(2) The anaphylactic policy shall include the following:
1. Strategies that reduce the risk of exposure to anaphylactic causative agents in classrooms and common school areas.
2. A communication plan for the dissemination of information on life-threatening allergies to parents, pupils and employees.
3. Regular training on dealing with life-threatening allergies for all employees and others who are in direct contact with pupils on a regular basis.
4. A requirement that every school principal develop an individual plan for each pupil who has an anaphylactic allergy.
5. A requirement that every school principal ensure that, upon registration, parents, guardians and pupils shall be asked to supply information on life-threatening allergies.
6. A requirement that every school principal maintain a file for each anaphylactic pupil of current treatment and other information, including a copy of any prescriptions and instructions from the pupil's physician or nurse and a current emergency contact list.


Quote:
Contents of individual plan
(3) An individual plan for a pupil with an anaphylactic allergy shall be consistent with the board's policy and shall include:
1. Details informing employees and others who are in direct contact with the pupil on a regular basis of the type of allergy, monitoring and avoidance strategies and appropriate treatment.
2. A readily accessible emergency procedure for the pupil, including emergency contact information.
3. Storage for epinephrine auto-injectors, where necessary.

http://www.ontla.on.ca/web/bills/bills_ ... ionID=38:1

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2008 9:35 am 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 687
Location: Cobourg, ON
Most schools had emergency medical plans in place prior to Sabrina's law. But now with the rise of many other allergies (other than peanuts) preventative plans or "risk reduction" plans need to be in place also. I think schools forget this important part and most medical school forms do not provide or allow room for preventative measures. I add a page to our board's medical form to record all of the measures that we feel are necessary to keep our daughter safe (see post above). If it is not written down then it is not likely to be followed up.

_________________
13 year old daughter -- lives with life-threatening allergies to milk, tree nuts and peanuts; seasonal allergies (birch, maple, ragweed); pet allergies; asthma; and eczema
10 year old son - no allergies


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2008 7:01 am 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6456
Location: Ottawa
Schools also forget about regular disemination of information to parents and students.
One line about allergies buried in a newsletter is not sufficient.

I am happy to hear about schools who discuss anaphylaxis in the classroom.

Our school newsletter went home with this entry:
Quote:
Life-Threatening Allergies
There are a significant number of students in our school with life-threatening allergies to certain food items, especially nuts. We must minimize their exposure to their allergens to the best of our ability by taking every precaution feasible in a school setting. Should there be a child with a life-threatening allergy in a classroom, there will be a letter sent home to all parents of students in that class during the first week of school informing them of the protocol to be followed in that classroom, which may include frequent hand sanitizing, daily cleaning of desk surfaces, “safe” snack areas in the classroom, and so on. For the safety of these children school-wide, in areas such as the gym (especially equipment), computer lab, library, and outdoor play areas we need your cooperation in not allowing your child to bring food to school containing peanut butter, please. The fact that peanut butter can easily smear onto surfaces, and is sticky enough to be difficult to wash makes it deadly to some students in a school environment. For your convenience, we have attached a list of nut-free food items, which we will also post on our website. We are grateful for your compassion and understanding.


It also included a copy of the article: 10 Things a Child With Food Allergies Wishes You Knew. http://www.allergymoms.com/uploads/news ... dwish.html

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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