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PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 9:23 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 12:34 am
Posts: 10
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Today my daughter came home from school covered in hives. She is 7 and rides the bus home. When she came in she asked what this curious rash all over her was, I knew right away that is was hives and gave her Benadryl. She is fine now.

Today’s offending food was cream that they whipped into butter. The teacher asked if she had eaten cream before. She does so she got to eat some. The thing is that our cream doesn’t have her allergens in it.

I’ve spoken to the teacher before about NOT feeding her any food. The last time she had a reaction the teacher asked her to read the label of the food. My daughter is allergic to preservatives and other additives, things like tricalcium phosphate, carageenan and sulphites. She is only 7! How is she supposed to read a label and remember thousands of chemicals.

I am furious!! I have asked that the teacher not feed her anything unless it’s from our home. I always carry my cell phone so the teacher could call me. She has special ‘treats’ available for times such as these. I’ve talked to my daughter about not eating any food that the teacher offers, and to just say ‘no thank-you.’ I’ve even told her that she cannot trust the teacher to keep her safe, regarding food.

I phoned and left a message with the teacher letting her know what happened and that we need to talk. I feel like I’m talking to a wall. I’m afraid that my daughter will have an anaphylactic reaction or worse at school because of the teacher’s incompetence.

_________________
son: asthma, allergic to grass, mold, pets, dust mites, birch, suspected lactose intolerance
daughter: allergic to penicillin, food additives/preservatives-phosphates, sulphites, colors, etc.
husband: lactose intolerance, pets
me: none


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 22, 2010 8:02 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6456
Location: Ottawa
OMG! :frightened I would be livid. 7 is too young to have to make life and death decisions.
I am concerned that your contact with the school/teacher is verbal and that there is no documentation.
Is there documentation on your child's file regarding her allergies? Is there an energency plan?
As this is not the first incident, I would contact the principal to discuss this.
I have found that it is very hard for little ones to stand up to authority figures. We switched form dd saying,"No." to her reminding the teacher of our family rule, "Dd doesn't eat/drink/apply anything that has not been approved (each time) by her parents." She is advised to remind the teacher about her special treats container as the teacher may forget (hey-their only human).
Your daughter's teacher has no appreciation of this condition and needs to be educated-fast!

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 22, 2010 9:50 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:06 pm
Posts: 217
Location: Terrebonne, Quebec
That's frightening, and i'd be up in arms. Even though I haven't put my daughter in any school yet, 7 is too young to understand all of her allergens and labeling issues as well. I would speak with the principle directly, the teacher clearly doesn't understand and it's a hazard to your daughter. I would submit a formal written complaint to the administration because this isn't the first time, I find things in writing hold more weight. If the teacher doesn't understand the allergy she can't be putting that responsibility on a 7 year old.

My stepmother almost made that mistake once, not realising that whipped cream was dairy, but it was a simple slip and I stopped her in time. She undertstands the seriousness of allergies and I would trust her to protect my daughter because she has been that much more careful since then. People are supposed to learn from their mistakes!

_________________
Daughter 3.5 years) - Dairy, Eggs, Peanuts, Sesame, Beef; asthma and eczema
Daughter (2 years) - Peanuts Eczema
Son (7 months) - Contact allergy to something food undetermined


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 22, 2010 7:37 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 9:40 pm
Posts: 2034
Location: ottawa
Chattymama, this situation is horrifying to say the least. :verymad Is she missing the fact that this is DEADLY behavior and is putting your child's life at risk. I agree with Susan, document all corresponcance and as Cauger mentioned go directly to the principal. What is it exactly that the teacher is having trouble understanding??? Even if she doesn't 'get' allergies what is so difficult to understand about DO NOT FEED MY CHILD.
If this teacher is so uneducated and careless regarding anaphylaxis is she prepared at all to recognize symptoms and take it serioually if you daughter was in fact to have a reaction.

_________________
DD 12 yrs -no allergies
4 yr old DS - asthma/eczema Anaphylactic to Peanuts, all tree nuts, sesame , all pea/lentil legumes, gelatin.
Allergic to trees, grass,ragweed, feathers, dander, mold and dust.
Outgrew eggs, fish, shellfish


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 3:58 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2943
Location: Toronto
Chattymama,

That's lousy. I'm with the others, if the teacher's not getting it - just jump her head. As Susan says, get in for a meeting with the principal, and then follow up in writing with what's been agreed to.

Several people has said they've found this Allergic Living magazine column by Laurie Harada very helpful. It's about "Talking to the School":
http://www.allergicliving.com/columns.asp?copy_id=339

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Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 5:50 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 12:34 am
Posts: 10
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Thank-you for your opinions and suggestions. I was terribly upset when this happened last Thursday and needed support. Since then I’ve spoken to the principal and she is great. The schools policies are very strict about allergies and feeding children with them. She is speaking to the teacher so that nothing like this occurs again. I feel satisfied that the rules will be enforced and that she is an ally.
The rules are that my daughter will eat her own snacks and food brought from home. She cannot have impromptu food from other parents, students, volunteers, the school snack program or the teacher. She has her own ‘special’ snacks to eat under these circumstances. There is also the option of the teacher phoning and getting permission for her to eat something that comes up. These have always been the rules, but now the teacher will have formally heard it from both of us.

_________________
son: asthma, allergic to grass, mold, pets, dust mites, birch, suspected lactose intolerance
daughter: allergic to penicillin, food additives/preservatives-phosphates, sulphites, colors, etc.
husband: lactose intolerance, pets
me: none


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 5:53 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6456
Location: Ottawa
That is great that the principal is on your side! :banana
I suspect this will be enough of a reminder for the teacher to get it. :thumbsup

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 01, 2010 9:44 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 06, 2009 11:08 am
Posts: 78
Location: Halifax
Just thought I'd add, when we were dealing with different daycares for our daughter, several of them required doctors notes to confirm she has allergies. I always found that a letter from the doctor describing her severe allergies and anaphylaxis is more formal and sort of makes it official in their eyes. It puts it in perspective for them; that I'm not some crazy nut who's being unnecessarily overprotective, or that I'm imagining things.

Most teachers were more agreeable after a note from the doctor (something to do with liability, etc.) Perhaps providing such a letter might help in your situation.

Noha

_________________
Daughter: ana to milk, eggs, peanuts, allergy to pet dander, asthma, eczema
Husband: ana to aspartame, shellfish, allergy to pet dander, eczema
Myself: asthma
http://www.allergymom.ca


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2010 1:03 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2943
Location: Toronto
Yay for the principal. Let me second Susan's yellow fellow - :banana

Good point re dr's note, Noha. I still find this true as an adult (not to mention the editor of an allergy mag.).

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Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


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