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PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2010 8:17 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 24, 2009 6:24 pm
Posts: 62
Location: NB
I politely refused to go back to my pediatrician regarding my son's (seasonal) allergies. My doctor will not send us to an allergists as he feels they are for adults and the local pediatricians host an "allergy clinic." My son has asthma, eczema, anaphylaxis and allergic rhinitis which I don't know if that means seasonal allergies. We can't use Singular. The only over the counter that worked was reactine and it stopped working. This made his asthma flare up, and we are taking reactine and benadryl with the pharmacists help. We are rarely in the emergency room but my son is often sick, tired or has asthma symptoms including the muscle pull in between the ribs or trachea. It's about quality of life and feeling like we are managing the allergic conditions. I offered to drive to another province to their children's hospital allergy clinic and we are going. I am really hoping that we will find out how to better manage seasonal allergies, and if ear infections are related to allergies and if we can get a peak flow meter to better monitor his ability to breathe.
I would appreciate any suggestions on what to ask or expect or even hearing about others experiences.

Jomatt

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Son - Anaphylaxis to peanuts, treenuts, allergic to cats, dogs, grass & trees


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PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2010 8:42 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:06 pm
Posts: 217
Location: Terrebonne, Quebec
Just curious where you are headed for your allergy clinic.. My only suggestion is to write down a list of questions you want to ask, because you'll always forget one or two and remember the day or two after and kick yourself. I would fly across canada if I had to for my kid, I know how you feel.

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Daughter 3.5 years) - Dairy, Eggs, Peanuts, Sesame, Beef; asthma and eczema
Daughter (2 years) - Peanuts Eczema
Son (7 months) - Contact allergy to something food undetermined


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PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2010 9:33 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 688
Location: Cobourg, ON
Our daughter was first diagnosed at the allergy clinic at Sick Kids hospital in Toronto. The doctors were excellent and we felt very confident in the information we were given. We returned there for about 3 years for follow up visits. We were hopeful that maybe she might outgrow her allergies quickly. When she didn't, we looked for a local allergist. The trouble with an allergy clinic (at least the one at Sick Kids) is that you often see a different doctor each time. You have to go over history and information each time. We also need a referral to go to the clinic with any new problem or if your last visit was more than a year ago.

At 4 my daughter had her first and worst allergy season. After a trip to our allergist, we got prescriptions for nasonex (nasal spray), patinol (eye drops) and we now use aerious instead to reactine. Our family doctor was no help. He hadn't heard of patinol and didn't think nasonex could be used for children. How old is your child? We also switched to Advair and have had her asthma under control since then.
We start the meds early prior to high pollen and it has helped a great deal. We watch the pollen reports and watch our outdoor time on high pollen days. We also avoid morning play outside when pollen is highest.

We just recently got a referral to a pediatric respirologist. We want to get a better advice about her asthma and make sure that her meds are appropriate. There is also an asthma education centre in the same city and we are booking an appointment there. The nurses there will be able to explain in age appropriate ways how to describe her symptoms and manage her asthma.

If your doctor won't refer to an allergist - could you get the name of a good one from friends/coworkers/family and contact the allergist yourself and explain your situation. It seems very inappropriate that your doctor won't refer your child to get the care he needs.

Oh - if you go to the allergy clinic you will likely have to have your child off antihistamines for a period of time. I would call ahead to confirm this.
Good luck.

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13 year old daughter -- lives with life-threatening allergies to milk, tree nuts and peanuts; seasonal allergies (birch, maple, ragweed); pet allergies; asthma; and eczema
10 year old son - no allergies


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PostPosted: Tue May 04, 2010 9:22 am 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2948
Location: Toronto
Hope you're trying to get into see Dr. Wade Watson or one of his colleagues at IWK in Halifax. Superb clinic, by all accounts.

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Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


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PostPosted: Tue May 04, 2010 10:44 am 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6492
Location: Ottawa
"How to Find an Allergist
Please visit the CAAIF website
http://www.allergyfoundation.ca/ "

Also,
Quote:
Compared with those who had not taken an allergy/immunology (A/I) rotation, those who had taken an A/I rotation were more likely to feel they knew the types of cases seen by an allergist (75.9% vs 33.3%),to feel they knew as adequate amount about A/I (59.3% vs 19.5%), to feel they were exposed to an adequate amount of A/I during residency (64.8% vs 9.8%), to view immunotherapy as effective (70.0% vs 52.3%) and to have referred a patient to an allergist (77.8% vs 46.0%). CONCLUSIONS: There are significant differences in the attitudes, opinions and referral patterns between physicians who have and have not taken an A/I rotation.

http://www.csaci.ca/include/files/Medline_5.pdf
http://www.allergyfoundation.ca/website ... ochure.pdf

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Tue May 04, 2010 5:08 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 24, 2009 6:24 pm
Posts: 62
Location: NB
cauger wrote:
Just curious where you are headed for your allergy clinic.. My only suggestion is to write down a list of questions you want to ask, because you'll always forget one or two and remember the day or two after and kick yourself. I would fly across canada if I had to for my kid, I know how you feel.



We are going to the IWK allergy clinic in Halifax. That's a good tip to write things down...I think I'll start a list. It's bound to be a lengthy wait.
Jomatt

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Son - Anaphylaxis to peanuts, treenuts, allergic to cats, dogs, grass & trees


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PostPosted: Tue May 04, 2010 6:58 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 24, 2009 6:24 pm
Posts: 62
Location: NB
[quote="katec"]

At 4 my daughter had her first and worst allergy season. After a trip to our allergist, we got prescriptions for nasonex (nasal spray), patinol (eye drops) and we now use aerious instead to reactine. Our family doctor was no help. He hadn't heard of patinol and didn't think nasonex could be used for children. How old is your child? We also switched to Advair and have had her asthma under control since then.
We start the meds early prior to high pollen and it has helped a great deal. We watch the pollen reports and watch our outdoor time on high pollen days. We also avoid morning play outside when pollen is highest.

We just recently got a referral to a pediatric respirologist. We want to get a better advice about her asthma and make sure that her meds are appropriate. There is also an asthma education centre in the same city and we are booking an appointment there. The nurses there will be able to explain in age appropriate ways how to describe her symptoms and manage her asthma.

Thanks for all the information !! I'm so hopeful that this visit will make my son's (he's five) allergies more manageable. I never thought of contacting an allergist myself...there is one that comes to my city monthly from another city.

Jomatt

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Son - Anaphylaxis to peanuts, treenuts, allergic to cats, dogs, grass & trees


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PostPosted: Tue May 04, 2010 7:00 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 24, 2009 6:24 pm
Posts: 62
Location: NB
gwentheeditor wrote:
Hope you're trying to get into see Dr. Wade Watson or one of his colleagues at IWK in Halifax. Superb clinic, by all accounts.

We are going to the allergy clinic at the IWK ! YAY! I did not realize it is a regional clinic for maritime families, I'm so glad I found out about it and requested to go.

Jomatt

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Son - Anaphylaxis to peanuts, treenuts, allergic to cats, dogs, grass & trees


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PostPosted: Tue May 04, 2010 7:06 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 24, 2009 6:24 pm
Posts: 62
Location: NB
_Susan_ wrote:
"How to Find an Allergist
Please visit the CAAIF website
http://www.allergyfoundation.ca/ "

Also,
Quote:
Compared with those who had not taken an allergy/immunology (A/I) rotation, those who had taken an A/I rotation were more likely to feel they knew the types of cases seen by an allergist (75.9% vs 33.3%),to feel they knew as adequate amount about A/I (59.3% vs 19.5%), to feel they were exposed to an adequate amount of A/I during residency (64.8% vs 9.8%), to view immunotherapy as effective (70.0% vs 52.3%) and to have referred a patient to an allergist (77.8% vs 46.0%). CONCLUSIONS: There are significant differences in the attitudes, opinions and referral patterns between physicians who have and have not taken an A/I rotation.

http://www.csaci.ca/include/files/Medline_5.pdf
http://www.allergyfoundation.ca/website ... ochure.pdf



Thanks so much for sharing this, I can't believe the wonderful info !

Jomatt

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Son - Anaphylaxis to peanuts, treenuts, allergic to cats, dogs, grass & trees


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PostPosted: Tue May 04, 2010 8:45 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 688
Location: Cobourg, ON
One more coping strategy we added to our seasonal allergy fight this year was sunglasses. My daughter picked out ones that she would wear and she keeps them on whenever she is outside. It is keeping the pollen out of her eyes.

Good luck at the clinic. It sounds like a good one. You will be relieved to get some help and expert advice. If you need a referral to a local allergist then you could get one from the clinic.

_________________
13 year old daughter -- lives with life-threatening allergies to milk, tree nuts and peanuts; seasonal allergies (birch, maple, ragweed); pet allergies; asthma; and eczema
10 year old son - no allergies


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PostPosted: Fri May 07, 2010 7:07 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 24, 2009 6:24 pm
Posts: 62
Location: NB
The sunglasses are a great tip. I was rereading the newest Allergic Living and realized that one of the Doctors that answers the questions is the director of the clinic. I am thrilled !!!

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Son - Anaphylaxis to peanuts, treenuts, allergic to cats, dogs, grass & trees


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