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PostPosted: Wed Aug 04, 2010 9:45 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:06 pm
Posts: 217
Location: Terrebonne, Quebec
Our daughter, now 20 months old has been diagnosed with asthma today, after over a month and a half of coughing and wheezing spells, night waking being short of breath and just in general her being really pissed off most of the time when she can't breathe.

So now I have to make sure I can get her to sit still enough to use the aerochamber. I've had asthma as long as I can remember, but never used an aerochamber back then, and she really doesn't like sitting still.. Ideas anyone?

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Daughter 3.5 years) - Dairy, Eggs, Peanuts, Sesame, Beef; asthma and eczema
Daughter (2 years) - Peanuts Eczema
Son (7 months) - Contact allergy to something food undetermined


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 05, 2010 6:25 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 9:40 pm
Posts: 2034
Location: ottawa
DS started using his aerochamber at 12 months and it was very difficult to get him to hold still. TV seems to be the only solution for the nebulizer as he needs about 12 min. on it. The aerochamber he now will use and want to hold himself. Unfortunately he didn't always like it and we'd have to pin him down and then hold it on his face. The good news is our allergist said when kids are crying and fussing they are breathing deeply and the ventolin is actually going deeper than quick shallow breaths. :lol:
Good luck. Oh, we also let him shake the cannister and then hold the mask on Elmo.

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DD 12 yrs -no allergies
4 yr old DS - asthma/eczema Anaphylactic to Peanuts, all tree nuts, sesame , all pea/lentil legumes, gelatin.
Allergic to trees, grass,ragweed, feathers, dander, mold and dust.
Outgrew eggs, fish, shellfish


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2010 8:35 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:06 pm
Posts: 217
Location: Terrebonne, Quebec
I've been noticing the ventolin in the aerochamber makes a difference so quickly. She'll cough really really hard after taking it a few times and then back to normal her. I used to have asthma as a kid, but am really unclear on most of this. I give her the puffer when she's got the wheezy cough, which is usually when I notice symptoms, i'm keeping track of the amount of times I give her the puffer so I can bring it in to the doctor when she's back from vacation at the end of august. It seems to resolve pretty well, but the concern I have now is that it's almost once a day I have to give it to her, which seems like a lot. Do they do controller medications for kids this young? Since I most likely have to wait until the end of the month for my answers, I'm asking the experienced ones on this one (other moms). I hate to give her the aerochamber, she freaks out every time, I have to restrain her pretty hard to get her to sit still, but as soon as she gets the relief the medication gives her, she relaxes, probably because she feels a lot better, but i'm hoping soon she'll associate the medication with the relief afterwards and stop fighting it so much!

_________________
Daughter 3.5 years) - Dairy, Eggs, Peanuts, Sesame, Beef; asthma and eczema
Daughter (2 years) - Peanuts Eczema
Son (7 months) - Contact allergy to something food undetermined


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2010 12:46 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 9:40 pm
Posts: 2034
Location: ottawa
our DS has been on singular since about 1 1/2 years old.
It is better to use the puffers when needed than have uncontrolled asthma. I used to hate to use them so much too but I know would rather use puffers all the time since once controlled (basically we never get off his yellow plan) he sleeps better and eats better and therefore is less cranky and happier.

_________________
DD 12 yrs -no allergies
4 yr old DS - asthma/eczema Anaphylactic to Peanuts, all tree nuts, sesame , all pea/lentil legumes, gelatin.
Allergic to trees, grass,ragweed, feathers, dander, mold and dust.
Outgrew eggs, fish, shellfish


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2010 1:13 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 05, 2010 11:37 am
Posts: 1523
Location: Alberta
And life is so much better when you can breathe.

Michele

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Myself - Seasonal, cats
dd-asthma (trigger - flu) anaphylactic to eggs, severe allergies to bugspray and penicilin,pulmicort
ds-Seasonal, cats and OAS
dh-allergy cats, bugspray and guava, outgrew egg allergy


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2010 8:33 pm 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6456
Location: Ottawa
Dd has been on Flovent since she was about a year old...dh thinks she might have been even younger.

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2010 8:36 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:06 pm
Posts: 217
Location: Terrebonne, Quebec
Good to know, i'll mention the frequency of ventolin treatments and see what the doctor has to say about it, hopefully something to make it happen less often, I hate middle of the night attacks, they wake up the baby too, and it's so hard for her to fall back asleep after the screaming fit it takes to give her the meds...

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Daughter 3.5 years) - Dairy, Eggs, Peanuts, Sesame, Beef; asthma and eczema
Daughter (2 years) - Peanuts Eczema
Son (7 months) - Contact allergy to something food undetermined


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2010 9:08 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 9:40 pm
Posts: 2034
Location: ottawa
Sorry to change the topic but Cauger I see your 5 month old has eczema. Have you introduced any solid foods yet....any problems????
Fingers crossed for you!

_________________
DD 12 yrs -no allergies
4 yr old DS - asthma/eczema Anaphylactic to Peanuts, all tree nuts, sesame , all pea/lentil legumes, gelatin.
Allergic to trees, grass,ragweed, feathers, dander, mold and dust.
Outgrew eggs, fish, shellfish


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2010 9:33 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:06 pm
Posts: 217
Location: Terrebonne, Quebec
She'll be 6 months old on the 22nd (they grow up SO fast).. I have been incredibly reluctant on introducing foods - kind of like PTSD, I get insanely anxious and think that every cough is a horrible sign.. I'm getting over it, her doctor said to do it very slowly. She loves her cereal, but it's milk/soy free and organic, so there is no real concern. I'm sticking to the same foods we feed our older one, and we'll introduce the dairy/egg and everything else much later because of it, and at least I've been given a thumbs up to use our older daughters epi-pen if we need it in an emergency (ambulances take forever out here and we only have 1 car, so if my husband is at work, I have no choice but to call 9-1-1). The eczema isn't as bad as her older sisters was and her skin is much less sensitive as well, i've also never seen a hive related to any allergen (like cats or dogs) so it may just be the dry air in the house and maybe some of the mold in the basement (we're removing it, but it takes forever...)

_________________
Daughter 3.5 years) - Dairy, Eggs, Peanuts, Sesame, Beef; asthma and eczema
Daughter (2 years) - Peanuts Eczema
Son (7 months) - Contact allergy to something food undetermined


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 8:15 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6456
Location: Ottawa
Can you let your child play with the spacer when she's not sick? Maybe pretend a doll or teddy is sick and take turns putting it on the toy? Let her know how much better the toy feels afterwards.

By not associating it with feelings of not being able to breathe and learning that it is part of the recovery, she may be able to relax a bit more and not fight it so much.

Little ones are much more aware than their verbal skills would have us believe! I firmly believe in using play to allow small children to explore and reveal to us how they feel about their medical conditions. Later on, it allows us to introduce concepts, reinforce rules and give them the words and phrases to advocate for themselves.

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Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 12:28 pm 
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Joined: Mon Sep 05, 2005 12:53 am
Posts: 375
Location: Alberta
I'm sure you're dealing with a CAE (Certified Asthma Educator), and they should have lots of tips for you. I am also a CAE, and some of my favourite tips have already been mentioned - the teddy bear one is a staple - pretend Teddy is having trouble breathing, and rescue him with the aerochamber. I always recommend counting out loud to 10 during this process as well, because at this age kids are usually into counting, ABC's, etc, so they quickly learn that when Mom or Dad reaches 10, then the chamber comes off. Both of these tips worked well on my son, who was only 9 months when this all started. Within a few days, he settled quite nicely and stopped fighting the chamber.

A couple of physical tips - NEVER lay the child down, sit on them, restrain them, etc. The medicine will not be effectively inhaled in laying down position, and this type of position can lead to other issues.. If there are 2 people available, have the child sit on one person's lap while the other holds the chamber. It may be necessary to hold the child's arms down for the 1st few times. If only 1 person is available, hold the child on your lap so that they're facing away from you. Use 1 hand on the chamber device, and use the other hand to hold their arms down if necessary. Count to 10 out loud ... pretty soon they should know the routine. We found this position worked great for our son, as I was able to use the hand on the chamber to hold it against his face to form the proper seal - and he wasn't able to wiggle out of it very much at all.

Most important - make sure there's a proper seal around the mouth and nose - and if you've been prescribed a Flovent or preventer inhaler, use it regularly! Seriously, a years worth of preventer inhalers is approximately equivalent to the steroid load of a single course of Prednisone in a year. We went from 3-4 ER visits a year, to 1 in the past 5 years thanks to regular use of Flovent. Up until that time, we were told to take him off of it a few weeks after each episode. His allergist set us straight, then I got my CAE and found out how "behind" some doctors are on asthma treatment. Each and every doctor we saw in the ER told us something different. He has asthma, he has reactive airways, he has wheezing, take him off puffers 2 weeks after, keep him on them all the time ... it's hard to know which doctor to believe. The CAE program puts everyone on the same page - we're trained to follow the recommendations of the Asthma Consensus Guidelines (developed by groups of specialists from all across Canada - resp, ped, infectious disease, allergists), and put everyone on an action plan.

Good luck!


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 12:39 pm 
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Joined: Mon Sep 05, 2005 12:53 am
Posts: 375
Location: Alberta
I just read your 2nd post - should have been more thorough, sorry :oops

So you don't have preventers yet - Ventolin once a day isn't so bad at this point, but keeping track is SO helpful for the doctor - good job! Sometimes they will start out with just a Ventolin to get the acute attack under control and then go from there. Some asthma patients only ever need as-needed Ventolin, and this is classed as Very Mild asthma. Basically, needing a Ventolin puffer more than 4 times a week is considered "uncontrolled" asthma, and would indicate a need for preventers. So by the end of August you should have a better handle on how frequently it's needed. Also, there should be no need for any puffers during the night, no morning cough, no missed school / work / daycare etc. These are all indicators that the asthma could be better controlled. The 30 second Asthma Test covers these points.

It's alot of info ... and don't worry, it typically takes months and months of reading, education & practice before most parents feel comfortable. It's often harder for parents who actually had asthma when they were young because the treatments have almost changed completely!


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 14, 2010 12:28 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:06 pm
Posts: 217
Location: Terrebonne, Quebec
Tell me about it, when I was a kid, I took liquid ventolin.. I don't even think that stuff exists anymore.. It's so different, that and I dont' remember most of that stuff, all I know is if I take my Advair, i'm much better and get a lot more done - and visit a hospital less frequently for flare ups.. It really is confusing, i'm using the calendar to keep track, most attacks have happened at night/naptime.. once during the day after chasing her around in circles for a half hour...

_________________
Daughter 3.5 years) - Dairy, Eggs, Peanuts, Sesame, Beef; asthma and eczema
Daughter (2 years) - Peanuts Eczema
Son (7 months) - Contact allergy to something food undetermined


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