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 Post subject: Re: Epipens in lockboxes
PostPosted: Tue Sep 21, 2010 11:46 am 
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Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2005 2:01 pm
Posts: 38
Location: Ontario
My wee guy is in grade 4 now, and luckily, never had a reaction...I opted for him to wear an epibelt to school from the get-go...reason (and I removed him from this particular school)...kindergarten teacher (apart from forgetting and allowing class "treats" from other parents) was a lovely 50+ lady, and the kindergarten class was the furthest room from the office - so basically, in the event of emergency, I am counting on this lady to correctly diagnose a problem with a 4 yr old in a class of 25+ kiddies, leave them unattended, high-tail it to the office, grab the correct epipen and get back to class to administer...within minutes - I decided it was not a logistical plan that worked for me. He wears an epibelt as part of his daily wardrobe - if it is not on him, he doesn't eat. No negotiation. The extra pen is in the office which is available to staff (and I have had 2 "lost" over the years from there, grumble, grumble), plus I have one that "hangs" on my fridge for my purse when we are out as a family. OK, I might have a few "control" issues, but experience has taught me that I cannot stress to others how important this is to me and I cannot control others behaviours and actions, but I can control that he has ready and available access to an epipen - ALWAYS.
Cheers,

Buzimom of 4 boys ages 17, 15, 14, (no allergies) and 9 yr old allergic to peanuts and shellfish


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 Post subject: Re: Epipens in lockboxes
PostPosted: Tue Sep 21, 2010 4:04 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 24, 2007 10:03 am
Posts: 37
Location: Ontario, Canada
I have a true story, just happened in June.

My son attended daycare at the school occassionally (school has onsite daycare).

He is high risk.

It was kept in the daycare.

I asked the worker if I could have it back, so I could give her new one (old one expired that month).

She looked in daycare and couldn't find it. Said to check the kitchen (across hallway).

I went to kitchen, to the 'epipen' labelled cupboard and it was locked.

I went to the office, across hallways, asked secretary. She told me to ask principal. He had to find the caretaker to unlock it.

It was not in there. It was in the daycare after all.

I was not angry. It was not an emergency. Daycare girl overlooked it in the drawer or something.

There were no epipens in the cupboard in the kitchen anyways.


It took me one email to the principal that that needed to change. He agreed immediately and it hasn't been locked since- and now my son has them on his waist.

_________________
4yo ds: Finally!! Milk and Latex allergy. Preservative sensitivity. Asthma. Hay fever.
6yo ds: Hay fever, ADHD, asthma, penicillin, azithromycin, cephalosporin.


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 Post subject: Re: Epipens in lockboxes
PostPosted: Tue Sep 21, 2010 6:21 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 05, 2010 11:37 am
Posts: 1523
Location: Alberta
I hope I haven't made you misunderstand me.

My DD has her own epi with her at all times.

When I am speaking of the one that has been locked, I mean the "extra or second if she needs it".

I also think it's very important everyone who works with children should know where the "extras" are kept, and also trained be trained to recognize symtoms and know how to use them.

I also think it's very important everyone who works with children have a heads up whenever possible as to who is at known risk and that children "never be sent away by themselves" when they are clearly having issues.

A bee sting or anything else could trigger something no one knows about yet, and wouldn't it be nice if that training were part of the first aid training that I feel everyone who works with children should have anyway?

I also agree with Dr. Waserman when she says no one should be expected to administer to themselves.
Sometimes some people can't, there just isn't time before you turn grey and pass out.


Michele

_________________
Myself - Seasonal, cats
dd-asthma (trigger - flu) anaphylactic to eggs, severe allergies to bugspray and penicilin,pulmicort
ds-Seasonal, cats and OAS
dh-allergy cats, bugspray and guava, outgrew egg allergy


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 Post subject: Re: Epipens in lockboxes
PostPosted: Wed Sep 22, 2010 7:02 am 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6471
Location: Ottawa
alberta advocate wrote:

I also think it's very important everyone who works with children have a heads up whenever possible as to who is at known risk and that children "never be sent away by themselves" when they are clearly having issues.

Bring the rescue to the injured not the injured to the rescue. :goodidea

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject: Re: Epipens in lockboxes
PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 11:08 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:06 pm
Posts: 217
Location: Terrebonne, Quebec
I remember I used to work at a daycamp when I was younger, and there was an autistic boy who was allergic to bee stings, and the daycamp kept the epi-pen with the head office because the boy couldn't wear it on him, he'd play with it. One day they were at a park 15 minutes away playing when he was stung by a bee. He started panicking and swelling up (his reaction time was about 5 minutes). Thankfully they had a really fit counsellor there who threw the kicking and screaming 10 year old over his shoulder and bolted back to the head office with him, and got there in time. I remember my supervisor being called up with the oxygen to meet them upstairs. The boy was fine, but they changed the policy saying that his epi-pen had to be worn at all times by his shadow (who wasn't really fit enough to run the distance).

I will always make sure that at leats 1 epi-pen is worn at all times by my girl, and I don't mind if the backup is in the office, because there will be time to get her there if she needs it. For her reactions she has never needed a second dose of epi anyways, only benadryl and steroid cocktail to make the swelling go down (which of course doesn't mean we wont be prepared).

_________________
Daughter 3.5 years) - Dairy, Eggs, Peanuts, Sesame, Beef; asthma and eczema
Daughter (2 years) - Peanuts Eczema
Son (7 months) - Contact allergy to something food undetermined


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 Post subject: Re: Epipens in lockboxes
PostPosted: Fri Sep 24, 2010 7:25 am 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6471
Location: Ottawa
You would assume that his shadow would notice his playing with it before he got it out of the belt and the grey cap off.

Trainers are great for kids who play with them. Let them get it out of their system if possible.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject: Re: Epipens in lockboxes
PostPosted: Fri Sep 24, 2010 8:32 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:06 pm
Posts: 217
Location: Terrebonne, Quebec
Well, his shadow wasn't working with only him exclusively, and he was FAST, so if she was busy with another kid it wouldn't take long for him to get it out, apparently it had happened before (he didn't actually stick himself, but the cap was gone, so they had to throw it out). I remember at the time thaqt I thought the guy who threw him over his shoulder and sprinted back to base deserved an award, because I'm pretty sure it saved his life. I'm sure the mother gave him a caard of some sort, because I remember I got a card from her that summer (I was his swimming instructor) because I had a major breakthrough with the boy, at the time I didn't really understand how big a deal this was to her, but apparently when the info was passed on the mom cried she was so happy (He looked me in the eyes, then did exactly what I told him to do, put his face in the water - and just because of that one time, he became a fish, he loved the water!) I liked that kid a lot.

_________________
Daughter 3.5 years) - Dairy, Eggs, Peanuts, Sesame, Beef; asthma and eczema
Daughter (2 years) - Peanuts Eczema
Son (7 months) - Contact allergy to something food undetermined


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 Post subject: Re: Epipens in lockboxes
PostPosted: Fri Sep 24, 2010 9:16 am 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6471
Location: Ottawa
Ohhh, I see.
That's a very sweet story. You opened up the world for that boy. :D

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject: Re: Epipens in lockboxes
PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 11:11 am 
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Joined: Thu Sep 02, 2010 11:52 pm
Posts: 58
Location: Alberta
Happy to have found this thread. My DS started kindergarten this year and I have had a hard time trying to get the school staff on board with an allergy response plan. The school requires his pen to be in the office but I honestly never thought it might be locked up during the day. THANK YOU! I will check on this point.

I put an extra pen (in the MEC epipen holder) in his backpack because he has to ride the school bus. Although there is supposed to be no eating on the bus some drivers do let kids eat.

I have a 3rd at home. Trying to ensure that he has access to 2 pens at any time.

My biggest frustrations with school:

NO, my 5 y.o. will probably not have the presence of mind to self-administer

and

YES, it's a serious allergy. Why do they always ask "how allergic is he?"

So very frustrated. I plan to meet with the principal soon to discuss their emergency plan (for all children, not just FA) and the need for regular inservicing of staff on how to administer pens. I worked in the hospital for years and still had to recert in CPR every year.

Sorry for straying....

_________________
DS 1: anaphylactic to peanuts, allergic to fish
DS 2: asthma


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 Post subject: Re: Epipens in lockboxes
PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 4:47 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 05, 2010 11:37 am
Posts: 1523
Location: Alberta
Do I ever hear you. Maybe you are in my school division, I think I got them out of lock up here but then again I think it has a lot to deo with who reads what. and how they see it.

My favourite (I really need a sarcasm character) questions are 1) from a principal has go to be "when was her last reaction?" 2) from a substitute teacher was "Anna Who?" and 3)from a guidance counsellor when I showed concern upon finding epipens locked in an empty room asked me "is this your first child?"

I wished I had said " Yes, but I have eight more with multiple allergies at home, they're coming later.

Michele

_________________
Myself - Seasonal, cats
dd-asthma (trigger - flu) anaphylactic to eggs, severe allergies to bugspray and penicilin,pulmicort
ds-Seasonal, cats and OAS
dh-allergy cats, bugspray and guava, outgrew egg allergy


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 Post subject: Re: Epipens in lockboxes
PostPosted: Mon Sep 27, 2010 11:41 am 
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Joined: Sun Nov 30, 2008 11:00 am
Posts: 1119
Jennifoo wrote:

My biggest frustrations with school:

NO, my 5 y.o. will probably not have the presence of mind to self-administer

and

YES, it's a serious allergy. Why do they always ask "how allergic is he?"



My 14 y/o was 12 when I administered her epi-pen. She still doesn't think she could administer it to herself and I agree. She was shaky, dizzy, blood pressure was dropping, agitated and more so very difficult to be able to self-administer. The other point is that even as an adult I wasn't sure IF I should administer it so that definitely is not a decision that a young child should make.

I understand the educators asking "how allergic" because there are students who say they aren't very allergic - e.g., a student who cannot eat a peanut but doesn't worry about may contains or traces. Very curious to hear how they came up with that but that is true for my former student. It also depends on the knowledge and vigilance of the family - when my daughter was first diagnosed we didn't know a lot and are more realistic now; still cautious but simply understand it so much more.

At my child's high school the epi-pens are in an unlocked drawer in the secretary's desk and she is the first point of entry in the office :happydance (but hopefully never need it) When I called the school the first time (before my daughter even attended but was registered) the secretary knew right away who my daughter was and her allergens. Guess it helps that the secretary herself carries an epipen...

_________________
me: allergic to crustaceans plus environmental
teenager: allergic to hazelnuts, some other foods and environmental


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 Post subject: Re: Epipens in lockboxes
PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 7:20 am 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6471
Location: Ottawa
I can understand the concern that medications in the classroom mught pose a risk ifthe students got into it.

Hanging a hook high up and in a visible area (near the door) would ensure that the epipen could be kept close by but not accessible by little ones.

Instead of accepting "No" as an answer, ask "What's your rationelle?" (it's much more polite than "Why?")

Once we know their concerns, we can work together to find solutions that everyone can live with.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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