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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2011 7:06 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2011 7:28 pm
Posts: 17
Alison's Mom wrote:
http://www.aircanada.com/en/travelinfo/onboard/dining/nutritional.html

Am I correct in interpreting their policy that you need to contact them 48hrs in advance in order to request the buffer zone, and therefore, if you are not requesting a buffer zone, then you don't need to contact them at all?


You need to contact AC if a member of your travelling party has a listed medical condition (which includes an allergy to treenuts. This is the strict aviation legal interpretation.

However if you do not mentioned to anyone at Air Canada or anyone on the airplane and do not wish to have a buffer zone established around your travel party; then you do not have to take it upon yourself to contact Air Canada. In this instance, your travelling party is assuming all medical risks associated with travel.

Not mentioning the allergic condition is a lot harder than first appears. Keep in mind that at anytime any Air Canada staff member can deny you and the rest of your party boarding the aircraft or remove you from the airplane. For example: you board the aircraft and find a passenger sitting around your area eating a bag of Tree nuts. You ask the passenger or flight attendant to refrain from eating the nuts. As soon as the AC representative hears of the allergic condition, they will consult the flight manifest and determine that your party has not been cleared by AC Medical. Therefore your entire party gets denied boarding and removed from the airplane.

The one saving grace is that CATSA (the airport security folks) is separate from AC and does not disclose to AC that you are carrying an epi pen or other medical device. You are free to disclose the epi pen to CATSA and still keep a tight lip to AC.


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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2011 10:21 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 05, 2010 11:37 am
Posts: 1523
Location: Alberta
alberta advocate wrote:
walooet wrote:
In the article, it sounded like they did not ask for a buffer zone - just advised the airline of his situation.
I think you are right....it's like they are making people lie. :freak

uh huh, this is one of those :banghead times.

_________________
Myself - Seasonal, cats
dd-asthma (trigger - flu) anaphylactic to eggs, severe allergies to bugspray and penicilin,pulmicort
ds-Seasonal, cats and OAS
dh-allergy cats, bugspray and guava, outgrew egg allergy


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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2011 10:38 pm 
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The CTA ruling is at the bottom of this page: http://www.otc-cta.gc.ca/decision-rulin ... 0&lang=eng
Quote:
127] With respect to the specific incidents that resulted in the applications filed by Rhonda Nugent, on behalf of her daughter Melanie, and by Dr. Huyer, the Agency has determined that Melanie Nugent and Dr. Huyer did not encounter obstacles to their mobility as Air Canada accommodated their needs, albeit in an ad-hoc manner.

[128] However, the Agency has found that the lack of a formal policy to accommodate the needs of persons with allergies to peanuts or nuts, and the uncertainty this creates, constitutes an obstacle to the mobility of Dr. Huyer and Melanie Nugent and to persons whose allergy to peanuts or nuts results in a disability for the purposes of Part V of the CTA.

[129] The Agency has determined that a buffer zone, including an announcement within that zone, is the appropriate accommodation for persons with disabilities due to their allergy to peanuts or nuts. With respect to the buffer zone, Air Canada is directed to provide a submission, including supporting rationale, within 30 days from the date of this Decision, on:

- what constitutes adequate advance notification of a person's need for accommodation in the form of a buffer zone as a result of their peanut or nut allergies; and,

- the recommended size of buffer zone for each of its aircraft types.


This certainly sounds to me as if the advanced notice, in the form of a Medical Fitness Form, is for accommodation in the form of a buffer zone as a result of their peanut or nut allergies.

If it is a matter of obtaining approval from Air Canada Chief Medical Officer, I would expect that a FREMEC card would take care of that.
Quote:
If a passenger with reduced mobility is a frequent airline traveller and has a stable medical condition established by the initial medical clearance, then a frequent travellers medical card (FREMEC) may be issued by the airline. (See FREMEC IN Appendix ‘E’). It avoids the necessity to obtain medical clearance for each journey and determines the passenger’s special handling requirements. Such cards are usually honoured by other airlines.

http://www.iata.org/ps/publications/Doc ... dition.pdf

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2011 3:03 am 
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2011 7:28 pm
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alberta advocate wrote:
walooet wrote:
In the article, it sounded like they did not ask for a buffer zone - just advised the airline of his situation.
I think you are right....it's like they are making people lie. :freak


From the Montreal Gazette article, the family did want a buffer zone set up.
Quote:
April Burns admits she should have found the Air Canada policy on passengers with allergies, but she felt it was taken care of when she booked Matthew's ticket.

When the family booked the ticket four months earlier through the RBC Rewards program, they had Matthew's ticket flagged so that Air Canada knew he had a severe peanut allergy, Burns said. But the information never made it to the airline's medical desk, said Air Canada spokesman Peter Fitzpatrick.

When the family arrived at the check-in counter, airline staff told Matthew he could not fly because Air Canada hadn't received the 48-hour notice specified in its allergy policy to create a peanut-free zone on the plane for him.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/upset+after+Canad ... z1MDIheO9b


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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2011 3:23 am 
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Susan,Good catch on the FREMEC.The issue with FREMEC cards is that IATA does not have a corresponding code or procedure to handle severe allergies. Also Westjet is not a member of IATA, so they don't accept FREMEC cards and AC would not accept what ever Westjet used as a FREMEC. If you notice from the link provided, the medical evaluation forms sampled by IATA are very close to the AC forms, however Westjet forms are very different. Because Westjet has different forms and procedures that are not IATA compliant, AC does not accept their paperwork.

Also with regard to the CTA decision, you copied the January 2010 decision, however this decision has been superceded by an October 19, 2010 Decision No. 431-AT-A-2010 http://www.otc-cta.gc.ca/decision-rulin ... 3&lang=eng

Enclosed is the full decision on accomodation for persons with severe allergies:
Quote:
1) Advance notice of a person's need for accommodation in the form of a buffer zone

Positions of the parties
Air Canada
[9] Air Canada submits that advance notice of at least 48 hours of a person's need for accommodation in the form of a buffer zone should be provided to the carrier. However, Air Canada has indicated that it will attempt to accommodate passengers who provide less notice.

[10] Air Canada states that a person with a disability as a result of their peanut or nut allergies must submit a completed Fitness for Travel (FFT) form and that it will require advance notice of at least 48 hours to ensure that the FFT form is properly processed.

[11] Air Canada submits that 48-hour advance notice period would ensure that a special service code is correctly inputted in the reservation record. Air Canada explains that its reservation system is complex and can be populated through various sources, such as travel agents or customers booking on Internet. As Air Canada's system needs to be accessible to others in the industry, it must use pre-approved and standard codes and there is no existing code for allergies. Air Canada advises that it will be recommending that the International Air Transportation Association create a code specifically for allergies, but this will take time. In the interim, Air Canada proposes to use a temporary code which may create some inconvenience for persons with peanut or nut allergies, for example, the need for the passenger to call its MEDA desk to have the code placed on file.

[12] In addition, Air Canada explains that it requires time to notify the crew and, if required, reseat passengers and that advance notice would allow it to attempt to re-seat passengers and regroup passengers with nut allergies in the same area.

Applicants' comments
[13] Dr. Huyer submits that Air Canada's proposed notification process is more onerous and complicated than necessary. Dr. Huyer is of the opinion that if it is such a complicated procedure to provide a buffer zone for passengers with allergies, Air Canada should instead not serve nuts on flights in respect of which a passenger has indicated that they have an allergy.

[14] Dr. Huyer also asserts that while Air Canada seems to be saying that there is no means for including notifications of nut allergies in airline booking systems, this is false as she routinely has this information placed on her file with other carriers. Dr. Huyer notes that for a brief period of time a few years ago, Air Canada had a notification system "that worked." Dr. Huyer submits that when she travels with other carriers, 24-hour advance notice tends to be sufficient to ensure that she receives accommodation.

[15] Ms. Nugent questions how and whether the information regarding a person's allergy would be relayed to onboard staff. She notes Dr. Huyer's difficulties, which were set out in the Decision, with the flow of information which led to a flight delay.

Agency analysis
[16] As reflected in Decision No. 336-AT-A-2008 regarding applications filed against Air Canada and WestJet by or on behalf of persons who require oxygen when travelling by air, the Agency's requirements regarding reasonable advance notice for disability-related services on domestic flights are set out in the following provisions in Part VII of the Air Transportation Regulations, SOR/88‑58, as amended (ATR):

151(2) where, at least 48 hours before the scheduled time of departure of a person's flight, the person requests an additional service that is set out in an air carrier's tariff, the air carrier shall provide the person with the service, in accordance with any conditions in respect of the service that are set out in the tariff.

151(3) Where a request for a service referred to in subsection [...] (2) is not made within the time limit provided thereunder, the air carrier shall make a reasonable effort to provide the service.

[17] Although providing a buffer zone is not an additional service set out in Air Canada's tariff, Air Canada's proposed policy with respect to 48-hour advance notice is consistent with subsection 151(2) of the ATR. As concerns advance notification, the Agency finds that Air Canada's proposal for 48‑hour advance notice period to allow it to provide accommodation, in the form of a buffer zone, for persons with disabilities due to their allergy to peanuts or nuts is reasonable.

[18] Air Canada submits that when a passenger with an allergy to peanuts or nuts provides less than 48‑hour advance notice of their need for accommodation in the form of a buffer zone, Air Canada will attempt to accommodate such passengers. As Air Canada's proposed policy in this regard reflects subsection 151(3) of the ATR, the Agency finds Air Canada's proposal to be reasonable.


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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2011 7:04 am 
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Cage you seem very up to date on the policy, tones of emails are hard to read so I will add that I am not meaning to be offensive when I ask but do you happen to work for the airline industry?
I appreciate all the links and further explanations you have offered, however, I feel that common sense (as far as Air Canada I mean) has gone out the window.

I'm sure the policies could be argued and picked apart and we could analyze wording for days. But to me this entire AC thing leaves me :scratchy ...why is it so difficult for one airline to do what another does every day with no problem.

_________________
DD 12 yrs -no allergies
4 yr old DS - asthma/eczema Anaphylactic to Peanuts, all tree nuts, sesame , all pea/lentil legumes, gelatin.
Allergic to trees, grass,ragweed, feathers, dander, mold and dust.
Outgrew eggs, fish, shellfish


Last edited by BC2007 on Fri May 13, 2011 7:23 am, edited 7 times in total.

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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2011 7:06 am 
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Location: ottawa
I fully agree Walooet,
Quote:
Regardless, WestJet has taken a proactive stance of How do we best serve our clients? by putting epi-pens on-board and simply being NICE when it comes to allergies! Many of us can provide examples of calling the two airlines to advise of allergies ahead of time and just how different the companies treat us.

_________________
DD 12 yrs -no allergies
4 yr old DS - asthma/eczema Anaphylactic to Peanuts, all tree nuts, sesame , all pea/lentil legumes, gelatin.
Allergic to trees, grass,ragweed, feathers, dander, mold and dust.
Outgrew eggs, fish, shellfish


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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2011 7:38 am 
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Posts: 1119
BC2007 wrote:
I'm sure the policies could be argued and picked apart and we could analyze wording for days. But to me this entire AC thing leaves me :scratchy ...why is it so difficult for one airline to do what another does every day with no problem.


I agree BC :huggy

The follow-up article still, IMO, doesn't say they asked for a buffer zone. It says that the family notified the airlines of the allergy --- that can't be an automatic request for a buffer zone. When we fly, I like the airlines to know of my daughter's allergy because if something happens to me or I'm in the washroom and she has a reaction I want them to be able to consult their manifest and know about it.

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me: allergic to crustaceans plus environmental
teenager: allergic to hazelnuts, some other foods and environmental


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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2011 8:48 am 
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Cage wrote:
Susan,Good catch on the FREMEC.The issue with FREMEC cards is that IATA does not have a corresponding code or procedure to handle severe allergies. Also Westjet is not a member of IATA, so they don't accept FREMEC cards and AC would not accept what ever Westjet used as a FREMEC. If you notice from the link provided, the medical evaluation forms sampled by IATA are very close to the AC forms, however Westjet forms are very different. Because Westjet has different forms and procedures that are not IATA compliant, AC does not accept their paperwork.

Seems rather short sighted of the IATA as the medical manual I quoted is the third edition and dated as July 2010.

Since you seem in the know, do you have any idea if severe allergies will be added to the codes?
I don't understand why you feel that the IATA does not have procedures on how to handle severe allergies. This should fall under the first aid training the cabin crew recieve. Anaphylaxis is covered in the basic level of the Canadian Red Cross Emergency First Aid & CPR course.

Quote:
6.2.2 Cabin Crew Training
All cabin crew should be given initial and recurrent training in first aid and basic travel health so they can intelligently use the first aid kit, and/or assist an on-board provider in using the kit. Some airline courses are based on the International Red Cross first aid course, adjusted to fit the needs of the airline industry, and the remote environment of the aircraft cabin. Some airlines have created their own cabin crew first aid course based on international standards, adjusted to fit the needs of the airline industry, and the remote environment of the aircraft cabin.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2011 9:10 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
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Location: Ottawa
Getting back on topic, Air Canada's denial to seat a NS man due to allergy.
Quote:
Matthew Burns arrived at Halifax's Stanfield International Airport, armed with several Epi Pens and allergy medications for the flight, but Air Canada would not let him on the plane.

"The supervisor told my husband, 'Your son is not boarding this flight today unless you get in contact with Air Canada medical desk.' He handed my husband the paper and said, 'Now, you're on your own. Basically, you're on your way, you handle it,'" Burns said.


Cage, you were kind enough to provided us with the most recent CTA decision. Based on this:
Quote:
151(3) Where a request for a service referred to in subsection [...] (2) is not made within the time limit provided thereunder, the air carrier shall make a reasonable effort to provide the service.
http://www.otc-cta.gc.ca/decision-ruling/drv.php?id=30193&lang=eng

I must conclude that Air Canada dropped the ball. I don't want to point all of the fingers at AC, I feel that there is a huge disconnect between the carriers and rewards programs.

We know where the carriers stand http://allergicliving.com/index.php/201 ... gn-update/
It's time that those rewards programs who insist on booking our flight make themselves equally knowledgeable.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2011 7:22 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2947
Location: Toronto
Quote:
Not mentioning the allergic condition is a lot harder than first appears. Keep in mind that at anytime any Air Canada staff member can deny you and the rest of your party boarding the aircraft or remove you from the airplane. For example: you board the aircraft and find a passenger sitting around your area eating a bag of Tree nuts. You ask the passenger or flight attendant to refrain from eating the nuts. As soon as the AC representative hears of the allergic condition, they will consult the flight manifest and determine that your party has not been cleared by AC Medical. Therefore your entire party gets denied boarding and removed from the airplane.


Having covered the issues of Canadian airlines and allergies extensively for Allergic Living, and having been on a conference call with Air Canada's head of legal and head of customer service on this matter, I can tell you that AC does not intend that its staff remove people from flights over their food allergies. The medical clearance is supposed to be required to get the buffer zone - but it isn't required anywhere in the policy to board the plane.

So Cage, I'm quite certain your above example is not accurate. Or let's just say - good lord, it had better be wrong.

However .... I'm not really surprised that AC staff/crews are confused; I don't really fault them but rather fault the internal communication, which has been poorly done. Flight attendants seem to be winging it on how to interpret this cumbersome new food allergy policy / buffer zone stuff.

When Allergic Living blogger Sam Yaffe and her son were almost tossed off a Miami-Toronto flight - she wrote a long post about it. She got Michael Tremblay, the customer service chief, to comment on her incident. From that piece:
Quote:

I quickly received a reply from customer service head honcho Michael Tremblay, who apologized and assured me that peanut- and nut-allergic people do not need medical clearance to fly. He also promised to track down the misguided Miami employee for a little re-training.

Tremblay writes that “medical clearance is required if a customer wishes the [buffer] zone to be set up but this service is optional.” That I was well aware of, but good to hear the confirmation.

The big question is: “If I don’t opt for the buffer zone, but choose to tell the flight crew that my son is allergic in hopes of receiving a courtesy announcement and some additional accommodation, can I actually be kicked off or prevented from boarding?

Tremblay’s response: “If a customer has an allergy that is not severe and does not feel the zone is required, he/she is not obligated to sign up for this service. The buffer zone policy was definitely not set up to alienate those who choose not to use it … it was set up to help those who do.”


Sam's column is here: http://allergicliving.com/index.php/201 ... er/?page=3

A second point about AC: the airline has not made clear how long the medical clearance is in effect or whether it will be kept on file. A new long doctor form for every single flight an adult would take would be onerous. But duration of the clearance has yet to be clarified.

Air Can. prides itself on its customer service awards, and is pretty good in most areas. But I just don't understand why it's so resistant to making this easy for people with food allergies. We need to travel – we're not whiners or malingerers or people who enjoy making a scene. We just want to keep the risk of a life-threatening incident to a minimum at 35,000 feet.

_________________
Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


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PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2011 8:17 pm 
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BC2007 wrote:
Cage you seem very up to date on the policy, tones of emails are hard to read so I will add that I am not meaning to be offensive when I ask but do you happen to work for the airline industry?
I appreciate all the links and further explanations you have offered, however, I feel that common sense (as far as Air Canada I mean) has gone out the window.

I'm sure the policies could be argued and picked apart and we could analyze wording for days. But to me this entire AC thing leaves me :scratchy ...why is it so difficult for one airline to do what another does every day with no problem.


Hi Susan,

To your first point, no I do not work for the airline industry, nor have I every worked (as an employee) for the airlines industry. I have completed a few consulting projects for three Canadian airline, non of which are in the area of Allergy policy or customer service policies in general.

My main interest and knowledge base in the airline industry is that of a customer. I have been an Air Canada Elite for the past 5 years and frequent traveler for over 15 years. I would be considered expert knowledge of the airline industry just from learning about the complexities of the customer facing aspects. For example, I sometimes do weird flight routing just to get a great deal and I am known to exploit fare mistakes (like flying to Italy for $38 or Australia for $1500 (the Sydney trip was in first class on United Airlines). Most of the discussion is not about cheap seats, but rather the complexities of customer service aspects (security regulations, boarding regulations, in the air rules, meal serving priorities, denied boarding rules, etc.).

Why is my interest and knowledge (as described above) important to this discussion? It partially answers your point two. There is a subset of the frequent flyer community that picks apart and analyze policy wording for days. Couple of online forums I frequent where this activity takes place: http://www.flyertalk.com, http://www.milepoint.com, http://www.theairlinewebsite.com (this one is primarily Canadian based airline employees - but anyone can join up).

How does this post affect the real life situations. Well to put it bluntly prior to looking at this site this is what would likely of happened had I been on the MIA-YYZ flight with passenger YAF/S (as quoted in Gwentheeditor's post above). If I had been in the executive class cabin, I would have talked to the In-charge to ensure that I still got the almonds and salad as contemplated in the service requirements for that flight. At a minimum I would of sent a note to Air Canada explaining that the flight attendants broke AC policy and made a general announcement rather than implement the buffer zone as contemplated in the October 2010 CTA ruling. The flight attendants would be receiving some retraining on requirements to follow the new AC Allergy Policy.

But I'm here to change. I do realize sense that Anaphylactic Alllergies are very serious conditions. At first thought I liked the October 2010 CTA ruling as a balanced accommodation for the medical condition (buffer zone is the only requirement). Today I think that there are holes and missing pieces with the CTA ruling. But I question "what else should be done"? As a frequent flyer, I fear the general announcement approach, but still need some more perspective to overcome this fear.


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PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2011 9:05 pm 
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gwentheeditor wrote:
Quote:
Not mentioning the allergic condition is a lot harder than first appears. Keep in mind that at anytime any Air Canada staff member can deny you and the rest of your party boarding the aircraft or remove you from the airplane. For example: you board the aircraft and find a passenger sitting around your area eating a bag of Tree nuts. You ask the passenger or flight attendant to refrain from eating the nuts. As soon as the AC representative hears of the allergic condition, they will consult the flight manifest and determine that your party has not been cleared by AC Medical. Therefore your entire party gets denied boarding and removed from the airplane.


Having covered the issues of Canadian airlines and allergies extensively for Allergic Living, and having been on a conference call with Air Canada's head of legal and head of customer service on this matter, I can tell you that AC does not intend that its staff remove people from flights over their food allergies. The medical clearance is supposed to be required to get the buffer zone - but it isn't required anywhere in the policy to board the plane.

So Cage, I'm quite certain your above example is not accurate. Or let's just say - good lord, it had better be wrong.

However .... I'm not really surprised that AC staff/crews are confused; I don't really fault them but rather fault the internal communication, which has been poorly done. Flight attendants seem to be winging it on how to interpret this cumbersome new food allergy policy / buffer zone stuff.

When Allergic Living blogger Sam Yaffe and her son were almost tossed off a Miami-Toronto flight - she wrote a long post about it. She got Michael Tremblay, the customer service chief, to comment on her incident. From that piece:
Quote:

I quickly received a reply from customer service head honcho Michael Tremblay, who apologized and assured me that peanut- and nut-allergic people do not need medical clearance to fly. He also promised to track down the misguided Miami employee for a little re-training.

Tremblay writes that “medical clearance is required if a customer wishes the [buffer] zone to be set up but this service is optional.” That I was well aware of, but good to hear the confirmation.

The big question is: “If I don’t opt for the buffer zone, but choose to tell the flight crew that my son is allergic in hopes of receiving a courtesy announcement and some additional accommodation, can I actually be kicked off or prevented from boarding?

Tremblay’s response: “If a customer has an allergy that is not severe and does not feel the zone is required, he/she is not obligated to sign up for this service. The buffer zone policy was definitely not set up to alienate those who choose not to use it … it was set up to help those who do.”


Sam's column is here: http://allergicliving.com/index.php/201 ... er/?page=3

A second point about AC: the airline has not made clear how long the medical clearance is in effect or whether it will be kept on file. A new long doctor form for every single flight an adult would take would be onerous. But duration of the clearance has yet to be clarified.

Air Can. prides itself on its customer service awards, and is pretty good in most areas. But I just don't understand why it's so resistant to making this easy for people with food allergies. We need to travel – we're not whiners or malingerers or people who enjoy making a scene. We just want to keep the risk of a life-threatening incident to a minimum at 35,000 feet.


The airplane captain can deny boarding to any passenger, this is basic transportation law. The captain must have a good reason and they are subject to a hearing with the chief pilot and vp flight operations. However with inclusion of nut allergies to medical condition list, its unlikely the captain would be considered to overstep their authority. The catain is also unlikely to over rule the incharge flkight attendant.

This is how passengers would be denied boarding or remved from the flight.

Gwen the editor, this situation is quite real and. Serious. I don't want people to be offloaded either. You stated that you have contacts at ac, brring up the situation with them.


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PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2011 10:04 pm 
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Location: Vancouver, BC
Cage wrote:


You need to contact AC if a member of your travelling party has a listed medical condition (which includes an allergy to treenuts. This is the strict aviation legal interpretation.

http://www.aircanada.com/en/travelinfo/ ... roval.html
I was just looking at this page and it list medical conditions that require clearance. Food allergies are listed at the bottom, but it says "You have an allergy to peanuts or nuts and would like to request that a buffer zone be set up around your seat in order to help avoid the risk of exposure." So again, I would interpret this as I would only need to contact them if I wanted to have a buffer zone set up.

The part talking about travel from Canada to the US is below, and the last point about needing medical assistance is subjective.

Medical certificate
If one of the medical conditions listed below applies to you, you may be required provide a medical certificate. Alternatively, we recommend that you ask your treating physician to complete the Fitness for Travel form, in particular its Section 4.
You require medical oxygen (e.g. Medipaks) or CPAP, or need to use your personal oxygen concentrator (POC).
View list of approved POCs for travel on Air Canada flights.
In addition to Section 4, your treating physician should also complete Section 1 of the Fitness for Travel form.
You have an infectious or contagious disease that could pose a direct threat to the health or safety of others on your flight (e.g. tuberculosis).
There is medical reasonable doubt that you can complete the flight safely without requiring extraordinary assistance during the flight.

Air Canada also requires a 48 hour advanced notice if you have any of the medical conditions listed above. We will nonetheless make a reasonable effort to accommodate reservations made within these time frames.

_________________
DD 2004 Allergy to peanuts, egg, sesame, and new: lentils and chick peas
DS 2006 Allergy to peanuts, tree nuts, milk, egg, kiwi fruit, eczema


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PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2011 10:57 pm 
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Cage wrote:
As a frequent flyer, I fear the general announcement approach, but still need some more perspective to overcome this fear.


Can I ask what is so special about almonds? :dungetit

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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