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 Post subject: Confused
PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2011 4:08 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 08, 2011 10:58 pm
Posts: 52
My daughter has been diagnosed with dairy and egg allergies. I've been searching the web for recipes and reading ingredient lists on everything.

But I'm confused. I know people who have children with a dairy allergy who still give them yogurt and ice cream. Now these are parents who would not ignore warnings about giving their child food. I think they honestly believe that it's alright and their child does not have any immediate reactions - that I'm aware of.

Is it possible to have a dairy allergy that is only related to milk?

Also, I've come across lots of recipes that claim to be dairy free but list butter in the ingredients. Is butter somehow safe for people with dairy allergies?

When I spoke with the allergist about my DD allergies, he told me to avoid all dairy products - which is what I've been doing...

Is there something that I'm missing? :dungetit


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 Post subject: Re: Confused
PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2011 4:58 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2011 4:26 pm
Posts: 386
To me, it sounds like you are doing everything right.

Some people either don't understand their child's allergies (and are thus putting their child at risk), their child's 'allergy' isn't an allergy at all, it's a mild intolerance, or sometimes it's just an excuse. I've seen it all, unfortunately. Sometimes 'most' dairy is removed from a diet to control musous levels in people with asthma or it's removed for personal beliefs, religion, or lifestyle. However, a person with a true and tested allergy to dairy should not consume any dairy products, not even traces. At least that's my understanding.

Butter contains dary, as does yogourt, cheese, etc. It's not magically exempt.

Dairy-free hard margarines are available and make great replacements for butter. (We use Earth Balance brand, and others exist.) 'Dairy-free' yogourts and cheeses are available too but be very careful as some contain caesien or other milk proteins.

Lots of vegan recipes exist that, when made with safe ingredients, are safe for those with egg and dairy allergies. Kitteekake is really delicious recipe and customisable to a wide variety of flavours. (We have a root beer flavoured Kitteekake on our counter right now!) Vegan Cookies Take Over Your Cookie Jar also has a bunch of great recipes for kids an adults alike.

I am sure others on the forum wil have heaps of advice and suggestions for you. Best of luck!

ETA: Kitteekake recipes: http://pakupaku.info/sweets/mixnmatch.shtml

_________________
anaphylaxis to tree nuts and peanuts; asthmatic, dairy intolerant, vegan
other family members allergic to to dairy, egg, peanut, peach, banana, sesame, environmentals


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 Post subject: Re: Confused
PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2011 9:59 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 2:45 pm
Posts: 790
Location: Vancouver, BC
There are also people who are only allergic to some forms of a food like dairy. My son who has reacted to milk and was skin tested as allergic, is starting to outgrow his dairy allergy and can eat skim milk powder baked into a cracker, but still gets a hive on his face if he handles my DH's empty latte cup. I have not tried yogurt, and did try goat's cheese some time ago, but he did get a hive so haven't given any dairy products apart from the fish crackers since.

Also, there are articles about people with milk and egg allergies who can tolerate them in baking but not other forms. I guess it depends on the person and how severe the allergy is. I would listen to your allergist and not give anything until you get his/her go ahead. Allergists can do an oral challenge in their office if they suspect the patient can tolerate certain forms of a food.

Of course, there the people who have a sensitivity as opposed to a true allery and also those who risk reactions by eating may contains.

If the children you are witnessing aren't reacting, it's possible they are having upset tummy-type reactions later on, or they are able to tolerate that particular food but not others.

_________________
DD 2004 Allergy to peanuts, egg, sesame, and new: lentils and chick peas
DS 2006 Allergy to peanuts, tree nuts, milk, egg, kiwi fruit, eczema


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 Post subject: Re: Confused
PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2011 9:32 am 
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Joined: Sat Jan 08, 2011 10:58 pm
Posts: 52
spacecanada wrote:
To me, it sounds like you are doing everything right.

Some people either don't understand their child's allergies (and are thus putting their child at risk), their child's 'allergy' isn't an allergy at all, it's a mild intolerance, or sometimes it's just an excuse. I've seen it all, unfortunately. Sometimes 'most' dairy is removed from a diet to control musous levels in people with asthma or it's removed for personal beliefs, religion, or lifestyle. However, a person with a true and tested allergy to dairy should not consume any dairy products, not even traces. At least that's my understanding.

Lots of vegan recipes exist that, when made with safe ingredients, are safe for those with egg and dairy allergies. Kitteekake is really delicious recipe and customisable to a wide variety of flavours. (We have a root beer flavoured Kitteekake on our counter right now!) Vegan Cookies Take Over Your Cookie Jar also has a bunch of great recipes for kids an adults alike.
ETA: Kitteekake recipes: http://pakupaku.info/sweets/mixnmatch.shtml


Thanks for the response, spacecanada.

I'm thinking that at least one of the other children must have an intolerance. I think I'll talk to the mom about how she is referring to the "allergy". Her child and DD go to the same daycare and are the same age; thus are in the same group. I don't want them to give DD daughter anything because the other child can eat it. It probably isn't a likely to happen - we send DD with her lunch and all her snacks - but it's better to cover all the bases.

Thanks for the websites. I've been checking out some vegan sites but find some recipes are better than others. I hadn't come across either one of those sites. I'm excited about the gingerbread cookies which I can make for Christmas for DD. I was feeling pretty bad about not being able to decorate cookies with her or have cookies that she could eat at Christmas time.


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 Post subject: Re: Confused
PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2011 9:42 am 
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Joined: Sat Jan 08, 2011 10:58 pm
Posts: 52
Thanks for your response, Alison's Mom. I don't think it's a case of outgrowing the allergy as your son seems to be doing. I think it's a case of an intolerance that they are dramatizing to get better results.

The problem is that it undermines my DD who has a true allergy that we are trying to cope with. As I mentioned previously, they both go to the same daycare. So on the one hand, you have DH and me saying not to give DD anything other than what we send, have the tables wiped down and all children's hands washed after eating. On the other hand, you have these parents saying their DS cannot drink milk but can eat yogurt, cheese and any sauces made with milk - but he is allergic. How overprotective do we look? Oh well, I guess it's just a taste of what we will be experiencing as DD starts new activities and stages in her life. I'm still hoping she'll outgrow both of the allergies, since it happens quite often.


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 Post subject: Re: Confused
PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2011 11:28 am 
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Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2011 4:26 pm
Posts: 386
Good point, Alison's Mom, I forgot about kids who are in the process of outgrowing allergies. It must be so tough for them because everyone was told they can't have a particular food and now they can have little bits but not 'regular' doses like the general public - best of luck to your son!

_________________
anaphylaxis to tree nuts and peanuts; asthmatic, dairy intolerant, vegan
other family members allergic to to dairy, egg, peanut, peach, banana, sesame, environmentals


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 Post subject: Re: Confused
PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2011 4:58 pm 
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Joined: Mon Sep 05, 2005 12:53 am
Posts: 373
Location: Alberta
Tina428 wrote:
The problem is that it undermines my DD who has a true allergy that we are trying to cope with. As I mentioned previously, they both go to the same daycare. So on the one hand, you have DH and me saying not to give DD anything other than what we send, have the tables wiped down and all children's hands washed after eating. On the other hand, you have these parents saying their DS cannot drink milk but can eat yogurt, cheese and any sauces made with milk - but he is allergic. How overprotective do we look?


You hit on one of my biggest pet peeves! There is a lengthy discussion on this somewhere (I think it's titled Intolerance vs. Allergy) and has a good, honest discussion about why those with intolerances insist on calling it an allergy instead.

My son has a milk allergy. Before he had the testing done at age 2, we were told to try soy cheese, as another child with a milk allergy in our neighbourhood was eating that. Just a few shreds put my ds into a full reaction. Turns out soy cheese is made with casein protein! That was my 1st lesson in intolerance vs. allergy. An allergy is to the protein. Any dairy product that has protein is likely to cause allergic symptoms. An intolerance to milk is usually due to the sugar, lactose. Big difference.

I've also discovered over the years that claiming a milk allergy is kind of fashionable. Many new-age-y thinkers are claiming that dairy and wheat cause all kinds of nastiness, and so are going gluten-free and casein-free. (Many celebrities are spouting off about it too - sometimes to control behavioural issues in their children) So these people are going dairy-free by choice alone, but calling it an allergy because they don't want to be served any dairy. I agree with you - it muddies the waters. I learned early on to basically tell those looking after him that his milk allergy was like a peanut allergy - to which I would then hear "I've never heard of that?!", and I get to go into a long discussion about his 1st hospitalization for a reaction, blah, blah, blah. I found it was the easiest way to explain it. My ds is also allergic to nuts, and now at age 11, he has never had an accidental exposure to nuts. He is definitely still allergic - had a walnut challenge recently - but avoiding the dairy has been a major challenge. I sometimes cook egg-free as well (usually from not having any eggs in the house...), and in baking I usually substitute applesauce or bananas. Need to adjust cooking time slightly, but things usually turn out pretty nicely! Very moist!

As someone mentioned, there are those kids that can tolerate dairy in baking. Up to 75% according to a study. Our allergist tested my son, and he passed. So while he's had 3 reactions since incorporating baked milk into his diet, it turns out they were likely caused by exercise-after-the-fact, a point which my allergist failed to tell us, but is now becoming apparent. One of them required his epi. Dairy allergy is a tough road to navigate, even after 11 years of being on the road!


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 Post subject: Re: Confused
PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2011 10:48 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 2:45 pm
Posts: 790
Location: Vancouver, BC
I think most of the parents who post here are 'those overprotective parents' - I'm sure I'm referred to as such by other parents at school. I totally hear you, and I don't know if there's much we can do, except explain our stance with facts about our children's particular case and what our allergists have recommended we do. I also make a point to get involved at the school and do more than my share of volunteer work. When people know you and your children, I think they are more likely to be understanding instead of resentful.

We all know allergic children whose parents let them eat almost anything, not check labels for may contains, leave the epipen in the car, etc. We all have our own comfort levels based on past reactions, age, sensitivity, etc, and have to live with our choices. . . .

If anyone asks, I would just explain that some people's allergies are more severe than others, and accordingly, a different level of precaution must be used.

_________________
DD 2004 Allergy to peanuts, egg, sesame, and new: lentils and chick peas
DS 2006 Allergy to peanuts, tree nuts, milk, egg, kiwi fruit, eczema


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 Post subject: Re: Confused
PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2011 11:00 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6429
Location: Ottawa
I think we're the parents who tend to drive the speed limit, wear seat belts, designate a driver when going to a party and floss regularly.

OK, maybe I skip a flossing or two but you get the idea!

Kaelynn Maschger Orland came up with this analogy on Facebook, comparing the request from allergic parents that schools have students wash their hands to the use of seatbelts. I think it's brilliant!
"You don't buckle your kid into the car because you expect to have an accident, you do it because you know the consequences of what might happen if you don't."

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject: Re: Confused
PostPosted: Sat Sep 10, 2011 12:06 am 
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Joined: Sun Nov 30, 2008 11:00 am
Posts: 1115
_Susan_ wrote:
I think we're the parents who tend to drive the speed limit, wear seat belts, designate a driver when going to a party and floss regularly.


Kids wear bike helmets! And wear sunscreen - unless my previous research is completely wrong, everyone should wear sunscreen regardless of skin pigment yet most of my kids' friends don't wear any.

ETA: I think the Research part is what differentiates me from many of the parents that we know...

_________________
me: allergic to crustaceans plus environmental
teenager: allergic to hazelnuts, some other foods and environmental


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 Post subject: Re: Confused
PostPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2011 9:55 am 
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Joined: Sat Jan 08, 2011 10:58 pm
Posts: 52
Thanks everyone for your responses and support. I'm definitely going to get involved when DD starts school - we're still a few years away from that...

Susan - I love that quote. I'm going to try to remember it for when I get push back for the safety measures that I request.


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