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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2012 11:31 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6456
Location: Ottawa
Wow, wow... this is fabulous!
Quote:
STANFORD, Calif. — Researchers have learned how a man-made molecule destroys complexes that induce allergic responses — a discovery that could lead to the development of highly potent, rapidly acting interventions for a host of acute allergic reactions.
The study, which will be published online Oct. 28 in Nature, was led by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the University of Bern, Switzerland.
The new inhibitor disarms IgE antibodies, pivotal players in acute allergies, by detaching the antibody from its partner in crime, a molecule called FcR. (Other mechanisms lead to slower-developing allergic reactions.)

and
Quote:
A myriad of allergens, ranging from ragweed pollen to bee venom to peanuts, can set off IgE antibodies, resulting in allergic reactions within seconds. The new inhibitor destroys the complex that tethers IgE to the cells responsible for the reaction, called mast cells. Severing this connection would be the holy grail of IgE-targeted allergy treatment.
The first time a potential allergen enters the body, some people respond by making allergen-specific IgE antibodies. These antibodies stick around long after the initial allergen is cleared from the body. Most of the antibodies get snagged by IgE-specific receptors called FcRs, which are exposed on the surface of mast cells. The mast cells are then primed to react the next time a person encounters the allergen.
Dissociation of this IgE-FcR interaction is a sought-after goal of allergy treatment for a good reason: IgE-coated mast cells are grenades of histamine, and re-encountering the allergen is equivalent to pulling out the clip. When an allergen makes a return visit, it binds to the pre-loaded IgE on the mast cell surface, triggering the release of inflammatory mediators — including histamine — that promote the allergic response. As allergy sufferers are well aware, these nasty reactions can occur within a matter of seconds. In a severe allergic response, sudden anaphylactic shock and death can be the result.

http://www.sciencecodex.com/mechanism_f ... say-101037

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2012 5:56 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2945
Location: Toronto
Susan, it's really interesting.

I've got a reporter trying to find out more about this mast cell-IgE receptor inhibitor (whew!) for the Winter edition of AL mag.

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Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 12:38 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6456
Location: Ottawa
:thumbsup

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 11:04 am 
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Joined: Sun Nov 30, 2008 11:00 am
Posts: 1119
It is wonderful to see promising research!

And it would be wonderful to read it in AL in layman's terms where I have a chance of understanding it :swing

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me: allergic to crustaceans plus environmental
teenager: allergic to hazelnuts, some other foods and environmental


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 5:00 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 924
Location: Oakville, Ontario
I am eagerly looking forward to following this exciting research/development. What does it all mean?? In a way, it sounds sort of like another Epipen approach... use it as needed, but i may simply be unable to interpret the intended use. Is it something that is done if there is a reaction, or is it a "treatment" for those experiencing anaphylactic reactions that can be put in place BEFORE a reaction? Nonetheless, looking forward to following this!!

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15 yr old daughter: no health issues
12 yr old son: allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, fish, sesame, sunflower, mustard, poppy seeds, green peas, some fruits, instructed to avoid all other legumes (except soy & green beans), pollen, cats, horses


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 06, 2012 3:27 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6456
Location: Ottawa
Julie, I think it's a way of stopping the body from recognizing something as a danger In essence, turning off the allergy. They have found a way to remove an IgE from a mast cell. Now, can they target a specific IgE?

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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