You are viewing Allergic Living Canada | Switch to United States

Talking Allergies

* FAQ    * Search
* Login   * Register
It is currently Thu Oct 30, 2014 12:16 pm

All times are UTC - 4 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 27 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2006 10:28 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:09 am
Posts: 1054
Lisa wrote:
In my experience, allergists here tend to do skin tests first unless there is some reason why the skin test isn't appropriate...and then if things are unclear they do a RAST test.

In Ethan's case, once his skin test showed a very strong positive for peanut protein, his allergist sent us for a RAST and explained that he wanted to be able to guage his sensitivity over time. The idea being that he would do another RAST again at, say, 4 years of age and then compare it to the score from his first RAST. He also said that with a very high RAST score, he would be less likely to outgrow his allergy.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2006 11:48 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2006 3:29 pm
Posts: 218
Location: Ontario
Ethansmom Wrote:

Quote:
In Ethan's case, once his skin test showed a very strong positive for peanut protein, his allergist sent us for a RAST and explained that he wanted to be able to guage his sensitivity over time.


Just wondering how old Ethan was when he first went for his testing? I've been wondering about a RAST for Sydney but wasn't sure how that worked as it did seem like something that was done more often in the States.

Saskmommyof2 wrote:
Quote:
I carry two food allergy action plans.


This sounds like a good idea. No one ever told us about an allergy action plan. What does it include?

Thanks.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2006 9:09 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:09 am
Posts: 1054
mygirlsyd wrote:
Just wondering how old Ethan was when he first went for his testing? I've been wondering about a RAST for Sydney but wasn't sure how that worked as it did seem like something that was done more often in the States.

Ethan was 2 months shy of his 2nd birthday (he's now 3) when his doctor requested the RAST. I don't know any more about the RAST other than what his doctor relayed (as per my previous post). At the time, it cost us $35.00 as it's not covered by the province's health plan. His RAST score was quite high and so his doctor doesn't think it's likely that he'll outgrow his peanut allergy :( . (But I'm still hopeful :wink: )


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2006 12:03 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
Our food allergy action plans are double sided papers written on the allergists letterhead. One one side there is instructions how to help a patient having a reaction. It is written in simple terms so others can understand. It basically says if the reaction is on outside use benadryll and wash area, and keep epipen handy incase needed. If the reaction is on inside use epi pen. When in doubt use epipen.

On the other side it has my daughters name, age, photo, allergies, health card #.

It says step 1: Treatment and includes doses of antihastamine and epinephrine.
Step 2 call 911...Also includes contact numbers for myself home and cel, and my husband home, work and cel. As well as GP's name and phone# and allergists name and phone #.

It states "Even if parent/guardian cannot be reached, do not hesitate to medicate or take child to medical facility. And is then signed by me, and my allergist.

My "rub a small bit of egg on back" idea was the result of my doctor wanting me to feed egg to her to see what happened. We had not seen an allergist yet, we already had a reaction to milk, I had benadryll at home but was not yet prescribed an epipen. He said a prick test was useless without prior exposure, so he suggested I give her some egg at home before our appointment with the allergist. I decided it was less risky to see if her skin (far from her mouth) would react instead of ingestion. She got a few hives, I gave her benadryll, washed it off with a cloth and bathed her afterwards. She has never ingested egg, but she is definitely allergic. I am glad I did not feed it to her. I also did not sractch or poke and it was a very small amount.

My allergist wants me to give my daughter turkey at home to see what happens (she is allergic to chicken). I do not want to do it. He can not test without previous exposure so he says it is the only way. Id rather see if she reacts to contact before I give it to her to eat. It is tough with little kids...because every new food can seem like a "food challenge", and the child has to be exposed to it before any tests can be done, and the allergist suggests "feed it to her and see what happens". I prefer to see if she will react to contact first.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2006 10:26 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 687
Location: Cobourg, ON
Saskmommy - The information you received about skin testing is different than what we have received. We have never been told that a prior exposure was needed before a skin test. My daughter was tested at Sick Kids at 14 months. We were referred because she had many reactions to milk. When we were there, the doctors suggested she be tested for egg and peanut as well since these allergies often come together. She had not eaten any of these foods prior to the testing (as far as we know). Even now she has never eaten any egg or nut products and continues to test positive for both in skin and blood testing.

When my youngest was born we avoided all of his sisters' allergens. At 2, we had him skin tested for milk, egg and peanuts. He was negative to all and the allergist had us do the peanut oral challenge in his office just to be safe. No wonder there are so many myths and misunderstandings about allergy if the medical community can't give consistent information!!!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2006 11:20 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:09 am
Posts: 1054
katec wrote:
When we were there, the doctors suggested she be tested for egg and peanut as well since these allergies often come together. She had not eaten any of these foods prior to the testing (as far as we know). Even now she has never eaten any egg or nut products and continues to test positive for both in skin and blood testing.

katec, Ethan had never eaten any peanuts prior to his first exposure and reaction (I gave him peanut butter on toast at a year and a half and his face broke out into hives). But I breastfed him and ate peanut butter on a regular basis -- they know that peanut protein passes through mother's breastmilk, so in Ethan's case I'm sure his first exposure and sensitization came through my breastmilk. Is this a possibility for you?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2006 11:35 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 687
Location: Cobourg, ON
I definitely ate peanut butter while nursing. Not as much as I did prior to my pregancy and throughout it. I did not eat many eggs other than baked products with eggs while nursing. I always mention this to the allergists though.

I know they have studied restrictions to diet and debate the merits of it during pregnancy and nursing. However, I ate a lot of peanut butter during pregnancy. In the early parts of it, it was one of the few things that didn't make me sick. I wonder in the case of a predisposed child to allergy if avoidance to peanuts during pregnancy and nursing would make an allergy less severe. In any case, I avoided milk, eggs and peanuts during my second pregnancy and while nursing. My son has no allergies so far however may be asthmatic.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2006 12:13 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
So does everyone else have an allergist who will test without previous exposure? My allergist said that a test result was likely to show negative if the child had not been exposed yet. He also wants my older daughter to try various legumes (which she has not had yet) and see what happens. It does not strike me as a good idea...and since she is a picky child, its not like she wants to eat legumes anyways. I have held off on legumes for oldest, and turkey for littlest because the kids probably would not eat them anyways, so why try them is my logic. He did say that he would "food challenge" them with turkey and legumes in his office (they have never had a skin test, he assumes it will be negative), because he knew I was hesitant and unlikely to try it at home just for fun. I mean, if we have a weekend day when my husband is home, I would rather do something fun with them rather than food challenges for foods they are unlikely to eat anyways.

My youngest daughter is allergic to playdoh. The cause is unknown, allergist suspects chemical or fragrance. We have no idea what exactly it was. So, we have to "challenge" her with exposure to other craft supplies. Let her play a few minutes one day, a few more the next until we are comfortable that she is okay with a craft supply (paint, glue, homemade playdoh etc.). FUN FUN!

Is everyone else able to test for "relatives of the known allergens" prior to having to feed it to them , and are the results accurate without previous exposure?

Also wanted to clear up some confusion as to what i meant about the egg thing. With little kids there are many new foods they have not tried. Each one can feel like a challenge, and you cannot test them for everything new. My preference was to touch them with it, instead of letting them eat it. We have let them try new things and ended up in the ER more than once. If they have eaten it already and reacted to it, ABSOLUTELY go for an allergy test, do not do your own homemade tests. But, if they have never tried it, I prefer to make sure they do not react to contact before I let them ingest it. Hope that clears up confusion about what I was talking about.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2006 6:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
ethansmom wrote:
Lisa wrote:
In my experience, allergists here tend to do skin tests first unless there is some reason why the skin test isn't appropriate...and then if things are unclear they do a RAST test.

In Ethan's case, once his skin test showed a very strong positive for peanut protein, his allergist sent us for a RAST and explained that he wanted to be able to guage his sensitivity over time. The idea being that he would do another RAST again at, say, 4 years of age and then compare it to the score from his first RAST. He also said that with a very high RAST score, he would be less likely to outgrow his allergy.


Good to know---things have changed a lot since I was a kid. And I suppose the RAST testing would be more important for children since they have a chance of growing out of the allergy.

saskmommyof2--while I can't answer your question about whether allergists will test without previous exposure, I do know that for at least the severe allergens people can have positive test results (and actually be) allergic without previous prior exposure. Perhaps exposure in these cases occurs in the womb or through contact? not sure.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2006 12:28 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2006 3:29 pm
Posts: 218
Location: Ontario
Saskmommyof2 - Thanks for the info on the Allergy Action Plan. A very good idea! The Allergist we went to tested my daughter for peanut, soy, sesame, chickpea, string beans & peas. He hadn't asked us if she was exposed to stringbeans & peas (which she had been though) before testing her. So I'm not sure if he just assumed she would have been exposed to it as a baby or if he was willing to test her without previous exposure. Although based on what everyone esle has said about their allergist I can't say I'm too impressed with our visit. Not sure if that helps?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2006 11:17 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6479
Location: Ottawa
Saskmommyof2-We were originally told to introduce no new food unti she was seen by an allergist.
Our daughter was tested at 18 months folowing a severe reaction to milk (cottage cheese) at 10 months.
She was tested for milk (known), egg white, egg yolk, cats, dogs, dust, molds, and the control. We were told she was allergic to milk and both egg yolk and egg whites. We were told not to introduce peanuts, tree nuts or strawberries. (she had already had wheat, fish, soy and corn with no reactions)
We have since been given the ok for strawberries, but were tod not to introduce nuts until she's 5 years old. She had hives once after having pea soup and the allergist tested her for split peas (they are a legume as are peanuts). It was negative and we feel it was probably a reaction to the acidity of the tomatoes she ate. She absolutely LOVES tomatoes!
I drank tons of milk while pregnant and breast feeding ditto eggs (ate, not drank). Not once was I told not to. I'm convinced she had her first exposure through the placenta or breast milk. If you follow that thought, she has probably had a dozen differnt foods the same way. Therefore the next time I give the food, the officialy "first time", it could cause a reaction.
Our allergist has told us it was probably ok to try sunflower seeds as they are not nuts but seeds. I have a bag in the cupboard but am waiting for a good weekend where she is completely healthy and we don't have any plans to be somewhere (just in case). I must admit I am anxious about it though.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2006 7:54 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2006 8:22 pm
Posts: 154
Location: Georgia
mygirlsyd
Howis your daughter doing? Hope all is well.

Daisy


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 27 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 4 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group