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PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 10:13 am 
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Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 1:10 pm
Posts: 44
Location: Clarington
As we are doing some renovations in our home, I had discussed with our contractor the importance of anyone working in our home complying with a no peanut and nut policy. He fully understood and let everyone know of our house rules. However one worker was missed and thankfully I was home to catch the mistake, do the necessary cleaning and throw out the front door mat that some peanut butter was dropped from the worker's sandwich. Needless to say it was scary for my child and family. As my contractor was on site and was immediately aware of the event, he was helpful and apologetic in this stressful time.

The following day, my contractor apologized yet again and made an excellent suggestion to post signs at the front door(or wherever work is being done) of my home alerting workers to our peanut and nut free home.(he knows there is more work to be done both inside and out).

Fortunately, I was home however what if I weren't? What about those families who are seldom home during such work? Are there other suggestions as to how to minimize this risk?


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 11:45 am 
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
The very few times I have had workers in the house (alarm installer, furnace cleaner, etc.), I have told them of the allergies and asked that they not eat anything in the house, and wash hands upon entering the house. I definitely think that putting a sign up if you are not home is a great idea. I would have to say that I would recommend NO food in the house, as not everyone realizes what is in the food they are eating. And include hand washing in the sign as well.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 1:29 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 1:25 pm
Posts: 323
I have the no-food in the house policy and hand washing. Fortunately, when work is to be done, I've always been able to either be there myself or have my mom there. I would put a little downer on simply putting a sign on... people are what they are and simply may not care... or you may end up with a peanut taped to it! :evil: (May just be the people I've met in my life... I seem to have seen more than my share of idots! :roll: )


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 3:08 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 1:10 pm
Posts: 44
Location: Clarington
They may care if I do not pay them


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 5:33 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
Mylene, I get more than my share of idiots too! I was starting to think it was just me! :wink:

When I had a home alarm installed, I told the guy in charge no food in the house due to severe peanut, nut milk and egg allergies, and that they had to wash. He told his "helper" and they both washed. Afew hours later, the helper guy came back with coffee and timbits (hello...milk, eggs, nuts!). I reminded him of the allergies and he said "its not milk, eggs or nuts" I politely informed him of the fact that cream comes from a cow, and so does butter that is probably in the donut. Eggs and nuts were probably in the timbits as well. They ate them in their truck and washed when they came in. Honestly, people fail to make the connection between the allergy...and what is in a food that has multiple ingredients. They may see "no peanuts" and think that a snickers bar is not peanuts...its a chocolate bar.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2006 10:33 am 
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Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 1:10 pm
Posts: 44
Location: Clarington
Rather than this topic becoming a bitch session about ignorant people, which I realize there are many, I was hoping to elicit a discussion of helpful strategies for myself and others who may have to deal with this situation.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2006 10:55 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
Andrea wrote:
Rather than this topic becoming a bitch session about ignorant people, which I realize there are many, I was hoping to elicit a discussion of helpful strategies for myself and others who may have to deal with this situation.


Andrea, I don't see why this thread can't both allow people to share their bad experiences (which I wouldn't refer to as a "bitch session"---non-allergic people don't understand so it is helpful--therapeutic even--to get to chat with other people with similar experiences) and to suggest "helpful strategies." Besides, I think being aware of the problems others have encountered might lead to an insight about the whole array of problems that arise...It isn't like a real conversation where digressions really do change the topic.....people can still respond to your initial post.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2006 11:40 am 
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
The idea behind my comments about my experience is that I would prefer a "no food" policy over a "no peanuts" policy. I wasn't just bitching :wink: I was bringing up the reality that non-allergic people do not read ingredients, and do not know what is in their food, and therefore would bring it into someones home absentmindedly. They may not bring a bag of peanuts if there was a "no peanuts" sign, but they might bring peanut butter smarties, a peanut butter cookie, trail mix, and various other baking including donuts with "crunchy" little messy bits on them that they don't recognize as dangerous to a peanut allergic child because they do not deal with allergies everyday. Also, if they are used to walking into someones house with their meat sandwhich, the day they have PB they may not stop and make the connection.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2006 11:44 am 
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Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 6:48 pm
Posts: 614
Location: Ontario, Canada / Cambridge, UK
The sign is a good idea... but restrict ALL foods so there are no misunderstandings as to what foods contains nuts and peanuts. One suggestion would be "PLEASE DO NOT BRING FOOD OR BEVERAGES IN THE HOUSE". Also, make sure this is discussed ahead of time when you decide to hire the person/company.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2006 11:55 am 
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Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 1:10 pm
Posts: 44
Location: Clarington
Given that peanut butter entered my home and that I am immersed in renovations, I am now acutely aware of the problems that arise. I also am operating on the assumption that everyone in this forum is intelligent enough to assess the potential magnitude of this problem. Although it would be nice to vent to empathetic ears, I do not have the luxury of time presently and hoped, without spelling it out, that members would understand the urgency of this situation.

If I offended regarding my reference to a female dog session, I apologize as it was not my intention to offend but rather to alert members to the need for concrete solutions to a problem.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 13, 2006 1:10 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 1:25 pm
Posts: 323
Then it's pretty simple and straigh forward:

- No food policy plus hand washing.

But people are what they are and have habbits that they do not change that easily, so keep you eyes open at all time and if possible, keep someone on the premises.

that's it.

Mylène


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2006 2:08 am 
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Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2006 3:03 pm
Posts: 105
Location: Coquitlam
Andrea wrote:
Rather than this topic becoming a bitch session about ignorant people, which I realize there are many, I was hoping to elicit a discussion of helpful strategies for myself and others who may have to deal with this situation.


I may have many of you upset with me after what I have to say because I'm looking at this in a completely different light.

Rather than getting upset and annoyed with people that don't understand allergies why don't you look at as I now have the opportunity to educate someone else in this world.

I have to admit that I was aware of life threatening allergies before my son was diagnosed but I didn't completely understand it. Everyday I still learn something new.

Most people are ignorant because they do not know or understand. I truly believe that education is the key.

_________________
Sil


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2006 10:07 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
Hi Sil, Well, yes, I believe that education is key too. But sometimes people just don't get it no matter how often one explains. A lot of us have had bad experiences---i.e. when I was a toddler and my mother left me in the nursery during the church service she explained the food allergies and asked them *not* to feed me anything. The woman thought that my mom was just being paranoid...and fed me a cookie. Projectile vomiting immediately followed....really, I could have died. There are people who simply think that people with allergies are overreacting...I met one woman (who had a science degree) who did not believe that anaphylactic shock happens...and her nephew is anaphylactic to nuts. She only believed after she was there one day when he reacted! I have lots of similar stories....i.e. I spoke with a doctor who thought that people couldn't possibly be allergic to wheat. I think she believed me when I told her otherwise...but who knows. Several years ago I saw my own grandmother eating cake which had egg and possibly nuts with her hands right before preparing my lunch with her hands (and she didn't wash her hands :shock: ) She just isn't used to having to think along those lines.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2006 1:30 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2006 3:03 pm
Posts: 105
Location: Coquitlam
Quote:
She just isn't used to having to think along those lines.

I think you just summed it all up.

When my son was first diagnosed I didn't understand the severity of it either. I look back and wonder how he didn't have another reaction.
I have one brother in law that is behind most of my kids minor reactions. It's not that he doesn't care or would want anything to happen to them but he and his family just don't understand about traces being left behind. I also have a sister in-law who doesn't believe in allergies either. I have been in her home and she has had all sorts of nuts in a bowl on her kitchen table. My younger son (seems to be more sensitive) will start rubbing his eyes and become irritable. I have asked her to remove the nuts and she will put them on the counter. :roll:

I simply try to explain to her again and if nothing further is done I just take him downstairs and wait for the evening to end. I could get angry and refuse to go there again but in the end would that really accomplish anything.

I also put a lot of responsibility on the boys. Even though they are 7 and 4. I will tell them that this piece of cake may contain traces of nuts. Do you still want it? 100% of the time the answer is no. Last halloween my youngest then 3 would refuse to accept any candy that he recognized as having peanuts/nuts or traces. I told him to just accept them and we would donate them to the homeless. believe it or not he actually looked at me and said NO! I love you and papa and I want to stay with you! I started bawling. I was so proud of him. The next day I wrote a letter to the local paper explaining to all who hand out halloween candy the story of an allergic child who stood up for himself and refused to accept anything that could hurt him.

Basically what I am trying to say is we can look at it in a negative way and be angry with the world or look at it as an opportunity. Old habits and thinking are hard to die we just need to be more patient.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 24, 2006 9:20 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
Quote:
Basically what I am trying to say is we can look at it in a negative way and be angry with the world or look at it as an opportunity. Old habits and thinking are hard to die we just need to be more patient.


Sil, I don't see it as an either/or thing. I think there are some times for attempting to be patient and other times when frustration is natural and even called for.[/quote]


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