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PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2006 2:53 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2006 1:02 am
Posts: 164
Location: Winnipeg
wasn't sure where to post this...

DS tried whole eggs for the 1st time yesterday (he turned 1 almost 2 weeks ago), and it didn't go well at all. I was really surprised, especially since he ate egg yolks last week and seemed fine.

He began vomiting violently almost immediately after eating one piece of scrambled egg. It felt like this went on for a bit, but I think he quit vomiting after a minute or 2. Then he started sneezing repeatedly. Through the whole thing he looked terrified. He has vomited before when he had a stomach virus, but this was clearly different.

We have an epi-pen for his peanut allergy, and I wasn't sure if I should administer it. I just didn't know what was coming next, so I called 911. It was a bit silly, but I was thinking I would just ask them for advice about using the epi. The paramedics came, checked him out, and basically said it wasn't an allergic reaction. I just left it at that, gave him Benadryl b/c he was still a bit sneezy and stuffy, and followed up with our pediatrician, who (of course!) acknowledged the reaction for what it was. She will be sending us back to the allergist in a few months.

So now (b/c I'm bf'g) I'm off eggs and all derivatives, and so is baby. The only good I see from that experience yesterday was that maybe it was a wake-up call for how serious things could be with exposures. That's not to say we haven't been careful with peanuts, soy, and milk over the past almost-year, but it really hits home when you see a sample of what could happen. Thankfully he didn't have any breathing trouble, but this episode was frightening enough. His reactions to milk and soy were more along the "ugly diaper" variety, so it was a new experience to see this violent, physical reaction. (And peanuts only appeared as an allergy in testing.)

Thank you for reading this rambling, disconnected message. I just needed to share it with people who can likely relate. Thank you so much.
Marla

*********
ds, 1 year old, allergic to egg, peanuts, milk and soy


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PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2006 4:12 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
sorry to hear about your son's reaction! that must have been quite terrifying. I can relate to not knowing what to do---one would think that calling 9-1-1 would be the right course of action! I guess we just have to rely on what the allergist says and not trust anyone else (including family physicians and paramedics) to know what to do.

I'm concerned about what seems to be a dangerous misconception on the part of people who are supposed to be giving reliable medical advice and treatment.
I did the same thing as you several years ago when I was throwing up after breakfast. I wasn't sure what to do so I made an apologetic 9-1-1 call + they told me as well that vomiting is not a sign of an allergic reaction. (I stopped eating wheat after that day because I had been wondering if I was allergic...I was subsequently diagnosed with a wheat allergy.) I wonder if way back when (say 30 years ago) this was standard medical advice? Or is this just a myth that has somehow gotten around? When I was your son's age and my mother mentioned that projectile vomiting ensued as soon as I was given a bit of egg or soy milk, the family doctor told her not to worry--this wasn't an allergic reaction! thankfully she didn't listen to him.

Your son has a lot of things to avoid---I would find it difficult to have to avoid soy *and* dairy.


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PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2006 5:57 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2006 3:29 pm
Posts: 218
Location: Ontario
I'm sorry to hear about your son's reaction. Seeing your child like that really does open your eyes.

Interestingly enough when my dd had her last reaction to humous (before we knew of her sesame & chickpea allergy) we had to administer her Epi pen that we had for her known peanut allergy. The paremedics were also called, checked her out, said we did everything fine and that we could go to the hospital if we wanted but we'd just be waiting there for 4+hrs to be sent home and that she would be fine if we stayed home. Little did I know then that a reaction could come back! :shock: We were lucky that she was fine after that but it's made me realise that although the medical community is there to help they don't always know everything either.

Glad your son is fine now.


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PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2006 6:21 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
mygirlsyd wrote:


The paremedics were also called, checked her out, said we did everything fine and that we could go to the hospital if we wanted but we'd just be waiting there for 4+hrs to be sent home and that she would be fine if we stayed home.


Ackkk! As I'm sure you know now, one is *always* *always* supposed to go to the hospital if one takes the epi.


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PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2006 9:10 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2006 3:29 pm
Posts: 218
Location: Ontario
Helen - yes! We know that now. But obviously didn't know it at the time. We did a follow up with our Dr and he was shocked at the advice we were given.

Live and learn.


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PostPosted: Sun May 07, 2006 3:16 am 
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Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 6:48 pm
Posts: 614
Location: Ontario, Canada / Cambridge, UK
I had a positive experience with Ontario paramedics a few years ago. When I was new to all this... I wasn't sure if my son was having an allergic reaction (looong story, I'll spare you the details) so I called 911 to ask if I should give the Epipen. Before I could even finish asking the question, they had already dispatched an ambulance to my house. They heard "possible allergic reaction" and acted immediately. While I was waiting they told me it was my choice if I wanted to administer the Epipen. They also told me to remove his shirt and pants (so I could see if any hives were going to appear) and have him lie down in a calm, darkened room. When the paramedics arrived, they checked his heart rate and told me that it was my choice if I wanted to go to the ER (he didn't have any symptoms... it was me overreacting). However, they took the whole thing very seriously. In fact, the 2 times we actually had to take him to the ER for allergic reactions (when he was a baby, before he was diagnosed), he was always seen IMMEDIATELY. No waiting whatsoever.

_________________
16-year-old son: peanuts, nuts, raw egg whites, asthmatic
Self: allergic rhinitis, fragrance/chemical sensitivities, oral allergy syndrome


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PostPosted: Sun May 07, 2006 10:24 am 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 687
Location: Cobourg, ON
Shocking that paramedics are not aware of all of the signs of anaphylaxis. We have been to the ER once with a reaction and we were seen immediately. When I mentioned her peanut, milk and egg allergy and that I suspected a reaction - they took us in right away. My daughter was given epinephrenine within minutes of our arrival. I should have given it to her prior to going to the hospital - I learned a lot that day.

The story on the main web page of allergic living about a child's violent reaction (which involved vomiting) really hit home for me. It reminded me that I have to be calm and confident enough when early signs of reaction occur that I give the epipen with no hesitation.

_________________
13 year old daughter -- lives with life-threatening allergies to milk, tree nuts and peanuts; seasonal allergies (birch, maple, ragweed); pet allergies; asthma; and eczema
10 year old son - no allergies


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PostPosted: Sun May 07, 2006 4:23 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2006 1:02 am
Posts: 164
Location: Winnipeg
That story is terrific! I'm going to print it out, email it, etc. to share with friends and family (dh included). Thanks for mentioning it.
Marla


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PostPosted: Sun May 07, 2006 5:57 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:05 pm
Posts: 528
Location: Burlington, Ontario
As I have mentioned before on this forum, my daughter had her 1st allergic reaction to peanuts last February. Guess what her first symptoms were? Bad stomach cramps, followed by vomitting! The hives came maybe an hour later. I was giving her Tums at first to try to calm her nausea, but of course it didn't work, so I tried Pepto-Bismol. I thought it was just bad indigestion!

So now whenever she says her stomach hurts, needless to say I go on high alert! If she throws up, I am not going to wait for other symptoms. I will use the Epi-pen and call 9-1-1, even if it turns out to be just indigestion.

So cdnmama, I don't think you overreacted by calling 9-1-1, you did the right thing.

The more I read, the more I think that it is up to us to take matters into our own hands!


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PostPosted: Thu May 11, 2006 8:48 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
And this is why the new national guidelines are so helpful.

The following is taken from http://www.allergysafecommunities.ca/de ... atsubid=15:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Signs & symptoms

Signs and symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can occur within minutes of exposure to an offending substance.

Reactions usually occur within two hours of exposure, but in rarer cases can develop hours later.

Specific warning signs as well as the severity and intensity of symptoms can vary from person to person and sometimes from attack to attack in the same person.

An anaphylactic reaction can involve any of the following symptoms, which may appear alone or in any combination, regardless of the triggering allergen:
    - Skin: hives, swelling, itching, warmth, redness, rash
    - Respiratory (breathing): wheezing, shortness of breath, throat tightness, cough, hoarse voice, chest pain/tightness, nasal congestion or hay fever-like symptoms (runny itchy nose and watery eyes, sneezing), trouble swallowing
    - Gastrointestinal (stomach): nausea, pain/cramps, vomiting, diarrhea
    - Cardiovascular (heart): pale/blue colour, weak pulse, passing out, dizzy/lightheaded, shock
    - Other: anxiety, feeling of “impending doom”, headache, uterine cramps in females

Because of the unpredictability of reactions, early symptoms should never be ignored, especially if the person has suffered an anaphylactic reaction in the past.

It is important to note that anaphylaxis can occur without hives.

If an allergic person expresses any concern that a reaction might be starting, the person should always be taken seriously. When a reaction begins, it is important to respond immediately, following instructions in the person’s Anaphylaxis Emergency Plan. The cause of the reaction can be investigated later.

The most dangerous symptoms of an allergic reaction involve breathing difficulties caused by swelling of the airways or a drop in blood pressure indicated by dizziness/lightheadedness or feeling faint/weak. Both can lead to death if untreated.

For a description of how young children might describe the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis, see http://www.foodallergy.org/school/childdescribe.pdf.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Maybe we should all carry a few copies of this info around and hand it out on an as-needed basis!! Things are getting better, but 3 years ago we too were told that we could go home from the ER right after my youngest had a fairly severe ana reaction. He should have been kept for observation for at least 4 hours, and if it were to happen now (now that I know more about biphasic reactions), I would insist on staying.

Definitely live and learn...

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2006 12:02 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:05 pm
Posts: 528
Location: Burlington, Ontario
KarenOASG wrote:
And this is why the new national guidelines are so helpful.
Maybe we should all carry a few copies of this info around and hand it out on an as-needed basis!! Things are getting better, but 3 years ago we too were told that we could go home from the ER right after my youngest had a fairly severe ana reaction. He should have been kept for observation for at least 4 hours, and if it were to happen now (now that I know more about biphasic reactions), I would insist on staying.
K.


I made up a 2-page Word file that I print as needed, to hand out to parents when dd goes for sleepovers, birthday parties, any social occasion where there will be food. The 1st page explains how to give the Epi-pen, with pictures, and a mention to call 9-1-1 in big letters, and the 2nd page is a list of anaphylactic symptoms, with a few recommendations like do not hesitate to use the epi-pen when in doubt. You could add your child's allergen(s), as well as all your contact info, etc. It's a good idea to leave one at places where your children have activities like gyms, tai-kwon do places, dance studios, arenas, etc. or with the baby-sitters. If anyone would like me to email them mine, please send me a private message with your email, I would be happy to do so.

Karen, when you say "I would insist on staying", this is where sometimes we have to take matters into our own hands, as even the medical professionals need reminding. Armed with the right information, we have the power to do so.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 12:11 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:05 pm
Posts: 528
Location: Burlington, Ontario
To revise my post above, I just wanted to say that Karen referred to an even better emergency plan in another thread, and I would recommend that one over mine.

You can download it from:
http://www.allergysafecommunities.ca/as ... an_eng.pdf

There is also a French version at:
http://www.securite-allergie.ca/assets/ ... an_fre.pdf


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 10:19 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6490
Location: Ottawa
I made sure that our daughters school had a copy of the article KAren created the link to about how a child might describe an allergy.
They were very interested.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 09, 2006 7:45 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2006 8:22 pm
Posts: 154
Location: Georgia
Hi,
Here is a chart that was posted on another board. Because I have GI symptoms, instead of hives, sometimes my systemic reactions are questioned by ER Docs. My husband shrunk and laminated this chart and I keep it in my purse. On the back is the name and # of my Allergist.

This chart is the Pediatric guideline for when to use the Epi.

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/c ... S2/1601/T2

Daisy


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 09, 2006 8:17 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2006 1:02 am
Posts: 164
Location: Winnipeg
Thank you, Daisy. This looks like it will be useful!
Marla


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