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PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2006 8:00 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
listening to one of the podcasts on the AL website + reading the new national guidelines for anaphylaxis management got me thinking....

I'm wondering how common it is for allergists to give their patients a written plan. And what is the purpose of having it in writing? Is it just so that we can review it? Or is there a purpose of having one in case we are ever in an emergency situation so that the hospital staff understand the severity of the allergy? Or...?


Last edited by Helen on Thu Jun 01, 2006 8:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2006 2:30 am 
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Joined: Wed May 31, 2006 12:18 am
Posts: 45
Location: Edmonton
Hi Helen,

I've personally never even heard of an allergy plan! But it sounds like a good idea to me! My allergist never even told me whether i should take a benadryl as well as my EpiPen before going to the hospital. Listening to the podcast, I was also surprised that everyone who has an EpiPen should have two in case they need a second dose. i've never had to use mine *knock on wood* but right now I only have one and I don't know whether I need another!
I think an allergy plan is meant for yourself to review as well as for other people who may be with you when you react. I intend on finding out more about them and making a plan myself and posting on the fridge in my house and talking to my parents about it. I think i will also e-mail it to my friends so that they know what to do.
Hope this helps!

Caroline

_________________
Anaphylaxis to fish, nut, peanuts, soy, birch, and grass.
OAS


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PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2006 9:14 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:05 pm
Posts: 528
Location: Burlington, Ontario
I sort of made up my own emergency plan for my daughter, and I hand it to parents when she goes to parties or sleepovers. I also attach it to the school permission forms for field trips.

It basically shows how to use the Epipen, and explains not to hesitate to administer it at the first sign or symptom of anaphylaxis (which I listed), and the instruction in bold letters to call 9-1-1. I also included all our contact numbers, cell phones, etc.

Like Karen, I strongly believe there should be allergy educators, just like there are asthma educators. We saw one a couple of years ago for my daughter and she wrote an action plan for her, showed her how to take her meds, how to use a peak flow meter, etc.

I will mention it to our allergist next time I see her and ask her why there is no such thing as an allergy educator, providing of course that she has time for us and we don't get rushed out of the office!!

The 1st time we were at the allergist a couple of weeks ago, there was no form of education whatsoever, just testing. We got more info from the E.R. doctor! We weren't even told to at least join a support group, no information package, nothing of the sort. To tell you the truth, we probably don't need that much info, because I have researched enough on my own, but what if we were a family that didn't have access to the Internet or didn't have friends in the same predicament? What then?


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PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2006 11:31 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
There is an Anaphylaxis Emergency Plan at http://www.allergysafecommunities.ca/de ... atsubid=33 - and you can also download it from that same site by clicking on the text at the top right of the window.

The French version is at http://www.securite-allergie.ca/default.asp?catid=18&catsubid=33.

Right now this form has to be printed off and filled out afterwards, but I have created my own version in Word for each of my boys so that I can print off multiple copies. If you want a copy, PM me and I'll send it to you.

We have an anaphylaxis plans up at the kids' school and daycare, and I have one up at home for family and the babysitter (and sometimes for me when I can't remember all of my oldest's allergies! LOL).

I have also taken the plan to the hospital when the kids have had minor surgery. It was taped up near them and a copy put in their file. I wanted to make sure that no one gave them food or popsicles or such, and that they knew that the kids had an egg allergy and didn't give them Propofal.

The anaesthetist was really impressed with the poster/plan - and wanted to know what doctor had given it to us. Needless to say, I quickly informed her that no doctor had given it to us -- it was ME (with some help from the AQAA, whose model I had used at the time).

It's also handy to hand over to camps, etc. so that they have all the info (and it can save you timing filling out forms sometimes).

If I personally had life-threatening allergies, I would likely have a plan like this posted at work. That way, people know you have allergies, know what symptoms to look out for, and know what to do in an emergency.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 12:26 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2006 1:02 am
Posts: 164
Location: Winnipeg
I think it's a great idea to have one of these plans to hand out. We're still getting used to teaching people about how to use the epi-pen, and something we've forgotten almost everytime is to tell them WHEN they would need to use it. Of course that was something that it took a while for us to learn, too!


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 11:48 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:05 pm
Posts: 528
Location: Burlington, Ontario
Gee, thank you Karen, I like this one a lot more than the one I concocted! :lol: This one looks a lot more official and serious. (Not that mine wasn't serious, but you know what I mean!)

This is an extremely well designed document. I like the fact that the Epipen is injected through jeans, the pictures in the one I have show the injection done directly on the skin and that could lead people to think that you need to remove clothing, which can waste more time. I also like the fact that it has a blurb for asthmatics, saying that this person is at greater risk and insisting that the epinephrine be administered before asthma medication.

Thanks for sharing it.

By the way, when I was at the allergist's office yesterday with my youngest, I read the new copy of Allergic Living magazine and I saw your picture at the beginning. It's nice to put a face to the name.[/i]


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 3:19 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2942
Location: Toronto
Thanks Karen! A great resource to know about.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 9:07 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
thanks for the replies, everyone.

and Karen, thanks for the link. I visited allergysafecommunities before but I somehow missed that page!

I thought that the "anaphylaxis management" plan would be an individualized plan giving detailed instructions about when to give the epi...but now I realize that the "plan" is simply to give the epi in the event of an allergic reaction (in my case, I would add, a severe allergic reaction...I'm not taking the pen for hives or for slight throat itchiness.)

It would be good to have on hand in case I were to have to go to the hospital for either allergy or non-allergy related problems and also to help other people understand. It's so much easier to give people an official looking document than to explain....

Caroline, on the benadryl question....my allergist says that taking an antihistamine won't hurt, but it isn't necessary to take it. the epi is the essential medicine...the paramedics should arrive before the antihistamine kicks in (don't know if it is the same for liquid benadryl which is absorbed faster) and you are going to get benadryl in the hospital anyways. But I do know that one person I know online was advised to take the epi + two benadryls.


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