You are viewing Allergic Living Canada | Switch to United States

Talking Allergies

* FAQ    * Search
* Login   * Register
It is currently Tue Sep 30, 2014 5:57 pm

All times are UTC - 4 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: How did you find out?
PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2005 8:51 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2005 7:19 pm
Posts: 207
Location: Halifax
When I was little, I always had "a cold". Always. After, oh, probably years, it turned out that I was allergic to our 13 cats (we lived on a farm), as well as being really asthmatic. To quote The Smiths: "I can laugh about it now but at the time it was terrible."

What's your story?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2005 1:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:10 pm
Posts: 121
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Initially, my doctors and parents just thought I had sensitive skin and was prone to sinus infections. When I was a teenager, an ENT told my mom I should see an allergist. Mom seemed surprised, since my brother had always had allergies and she thought I was okay since I didn't have asthma. ;)

Anyhow, it turned out that the things that always made me itch horribly and sneeze were all things I was allergic to: pollen, animals (especially cats and horses), dust mites, mold, you name it. And I have very tight nasal passages, so when I was exposed to something, my sinuses would swell shut and fill up with mucus, which would then get infected.

My food allergies were adult onset and diagnosed via RAST after I started having symptoms of hives and throat constriction.

Once I truly worked to avoid my allergens and to minimize their appearance in my home, my sinus infections drastically reduced in frequency. I used to be on antibiotics six weeks at a time several times a year--I was on them more than I was off of them. I haven't needed them in a few years now, not counting the last time I had surgery and was on prophylactic IV antibiotics. My eczema is also much more controllable.

ygg

_________________
~*~*~ That which does not kill me only gives me hives. ~*~*~


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 2005 9:04 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 9:47 am
Posts: 305
Location: Montreal, Canada
Firs time I hate peanuts, I was covered with rashes and threw up.,

Second time, it was my cousin's bathisma. There was a party and beeing an helpful child, I was carrying a sandwich plate (some were peanut butter ones). A little bit of peanut butter was on my finger. Beeing a kid, instead of washing my hands, I licked it. BIG MISTAKE!! Sneezing, coughing, swelling up, anaphylectic shock. 15 minutes later, we were at the hospital and the doctor was sticking a needle in me and telling my mom I must never eat peanuts or nuts ever again or I would die in less than 30 minutes. JOY!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 2005 10:15 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6468
Location: Ottawa
I copied this from a blog I wrote this about a year ago:
We were lucky(?) enough to have a severe reaction to milk when she was 10 months or so. I gave dd some Petite Danon yoghurt and as usual I placed a bit of the new food on her tray so she could discover the texture. She immediately got hives upon skin contact. I called the Dr and they thought it might have been the thickener carageenan gum. A week or so later I tried to introduce cottage cheese and again placed a bit on the tray. Her finger and thumb swelled up so much it looked like a lobsters claw! :shock: It was pretty obvious that she was allergic to the milk as she had salt with no reaction. That's all that was in the cottage cheese mik and salt.
The egg was picked up at the allergists through a skin test. She has never had any and as that reaction is much stronger than the milk, I hope she never has does.
We carry an Epi-pen everywhere. We are starting to calm down a bit. I have to realise that we are at a different place on the learning curve than her Grandparents. My mom is fantastic but dh's parents are older and somewhat set in their ways. Last summer they kept serving cheese to the kids and had corn on the cob with tons of butter. All those greasy smiling faces that wanted to kiss her goodbye! Of course they don't mean any harm but it was really hard to remember. I'd catch myself saying "Did you just touch my baby? You can't touch her with those buttery fingers!"
I try to remember that a hive is just a hive and I can wash her down and give her some benedryl, but the only way to out grow the allergies is total abstenence. Each exposure creates more IgE. So each set back causes us to feel guilty and wonder if she'll ever out grow it.
I showed her an egg at the supermarket and she didn't believe me!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 2005 10:28 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
During the summer of 1988 or 1989 (I was in my late 20's) I suddenly started breaking out in hives. There didn't seem to be any common factor. I could eat something one day and be fine - but then a week later eating the same thing I would get hives. Sometimes just a few - sometimes all over my body. I started getting them more often, and they were worse and worse. (At that time I was eating store bought bread. Sometimes the bread would run with sesame seeds and sometimes not. I also was eating buns with sesame seeds - and I probably wasn't considering that a food as I really didn't understand about reading labels and ingredients - things like that.)

The doctor said it was not allergies (due to no common factor I think). He said it was just that my body chemistry and had changed - and when it changed again the hives would stop. Or maybe (he said) it was just the stress of my mother passing away. There was no fear of anaphylaxis as that is caused by allergies. When my tongue started swelling with the hives he decided to prescribe an Anakit (also called a bee-sting kit). I carried that around for years, then stopped.

When I did go in to anaphylactic shock after eating a Sesame Snack (kind of like peanut brittle, but with sesame seeds instead of peanuts) my doctor said it had to be an allergy. I was then prescribed an epi-pen. (I was not carrying anything when I went in to shock.)

An allergist told me it was impossible to be allergic to sesame seeds as they are hypo-allergenic. He also said they are so small "how bad a reaction could they cause". Who eats only one? And when I questioned him on trace amounts of foods causing reactions he said that was *highly over-rated* and rarely happens.

At one point I was taking seven antihistamine a day. That was not to prevent reactions - that was to keep them bearable. When I finally managed to eliminate my two allergens and trace amounts I was able to get off that medicine.

I've had really bad experiences with allergists (four I think). Although I've been living with this for over 15 years, it's only within the last 2 that I got an *official* diagnosis. And, now I just see my GP. He says as long as I don't develope any new allergies he's OK with this.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2005 7:46 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 8:06 pm
Posts: 8
Location: Toronto
My son was 18 months old and at his daycare. I received a call that he was throwing up at lunch time. I told them I would pick him up and take him home. It took me 5 minutes to walk to my car . As I was exiting the parking garage an ambulance screamed past me. In my head I was sayiing why is there an abulance taking this street as a shortcut. My son's daycare was a block away. When I arrived the paramedics had my son on a gurney. His lips, eyes and tongue were swollen and getting bigger by the moment. This was during SARS so my son was freaked out by the masks and gowns of the paramedics. They took us 2 streets away to Sick Kids. It was the longest ride of my life.

At Sick Kids, we were stopped at he door by the volunteer who was trying to ask us SARS questions. Thank God the paramedics intervened, I was about to lose it. 4 hours later we were released from the hospital and so our story begins. We have had 8 severe episodes since then.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2005 9:46 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2005 7:19 pm
Posts: 207
Location: Halifax
Oh darkver! I'm so sorry. That sounds so hard.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Post topic
PostPosted: Mon May 23, 2005 12:32 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2005 9:50 am
Posts: 205
Location: Canada
When I young in the 60s and 70s my Father did not tell me anything.
I only knew as a baby I had "special food" and had cramps, cried all the time.
I have been told I had "Celiacs Disease" by my Dad.
They had to make me my food so the story goes.
When I was older (12) and had my first memory of having an anaphylaitic reaction; I was told to stay away from Lobster and clams.
I did not even know what had happened to me.
I never new until I was given cross contanined spagetti sauce from my Dad and my date took me to the hospitial. I was 21 years old.
I was always allowed to eat what I liked and not forced to eat anything else. I left home at 17 years old. . I always have had asthma and other allergic conditions.
So I have a few missing years and I can not find out anything about them. I have asked my grandparents and Aunt what they knew. Even they did not have any knowledge of what I had.
I quess no one talked..........
Anyway, my parents are gone and I was unable to get many answers before they passed on .


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 4 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group