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PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 9:38 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
It definitely is all relative.

One good thing that our school has is adult supervision at lunchtime. In Ottawa (I have found out), many schools have grade 6 students supervising younger students at lunch, or 1 teacher rotating between up to 4 classrooms. In our school (across the river in QC), it's 1 adult per class for those kids who are in the in-school daycare, which is the majority of the kids.

It definitely helps to talk to others to find out how your school stacks up...!

K.

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Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2006 8:41 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6429
Location: Ottawa
I hope we'll find that this year the schools are better prepared. At least in Ontario they'll have had the summer to reflect on what worked and what didn't.

We met with our school principal and both teachers (our daughter is going into SK). They are now recommending fruit and vegetable snacks only, no food celebrations (suggesting book donations instead) and the teachers plan to only hand out non-edible treats (rulers, erasers, stickers etc.) They are starting to realize that food rewards are not a great idea. The only reward needed is the teachers praise and their own satisfaction for a job well done (or at least completed).

The downside is that the Public Health Dept. is no longer providing the anaphylaxic training. The upside is the school is more responsive to our suggestions and actually requested that my husband give a presentation on how one parent copes with food allergies. Another mom who's son has food allergies is a RN, they are going to ask her to assist in the training.

I mentioned to them that next year these students will be eating lunch at school. This is the year that we shoud all be instilling eating etiquette. After reading the posts in the York region thread, I thought I'd plant that seed right now.

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2006 9:39 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 16, 2006 11:24 pm
Posts: 94
Location: Toronto area
Susan, I don't think you over reacted when your child was fed without your consent. I've been in similar circumstances and have come to realize, as I said in another posting, you can never let your guard down. Even when you think other adults in charge "get it", they go and do something that tells you they don't. Yes, we're all human and can forget etc but a child's life could be at stake. Anaphylaxis Canada used to have buttons that said "Don't feed me" - maybe you should consider having your child wear one, if she's okay with that.
Check out all craft supplies by ingredient - some sunflower seeds say "may contain" . Also, it will get the teacher realizing that even craft supplies have to be checked.
Stickers are just as effective as "food" treats when it comes to kids. Bus drivers are not (supposed) to give out food for any reason. Stickers work just as well.
A word for parents who's kids ride on buses - make sure your bus driver knows your child is allergic. Kids aren't supposed to eat on buses but we know it does happen. The driver can't watch the road and all the kids individually - so ask if your allergic child can sit near the front where the driver can see him/her.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2006 10:38 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6429
Location: Ottawa
Crafts supplies-checked and OK.
Bus Driver-same as last year, confirmed that he is aware and she will be sitting in the front row.
Classroom treats-non-food treats will be the rule this year.
Snacks-strictly fruits and vegetables. Parents wil be advised that celebrations will not include food, it is suggested that they donate a book if they wish to bring something.
We will see how it plays out.

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Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 06, 2006 1:51 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2006 11:37 pm
Posts: 100
Location: Nova Scotia
I LOVE the book donation idea. This should be implemented at every school, for so many reasons.

Susan it sounds like your efforts have truly paid off. I think the fact that you did a LOT of work in a short period of time, really had an impact. Your experience, and the experience of others who have fought similar battles, inspire me to know what can be achieved. Our kids have to be safe.

My son will be starting school next year, 2007, and I plan on making sure his school is ready!! And if they aren't, I will be following your example and contacting every person I need to. Your experience also really demonstrates the strength of Sabrina's law. If Sabrina's mom is reading....thank you.

We are not in Ontario. I'm thinking about spending this year pestering the NS gov't to implement a Sabrina's law here. I agree with saskmommyof2, how come the feds haven't picked up on this??

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6-yr old son: anaphylactic to peanuts; asthma
1-yr old daughter: No known allergies


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2006 10:12 am 
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Joined: Sat Oct 07, 2006 11:39 am
Posts: 15
Location: ontario
My kids school has given me a hard time because of my son's allergy. Coca is not that common and because there is no test for it they can't restict it at all. I just wanted no coca at parties because they keeped giving it to him.They actually told me that he should know not to eat it and refuse to ask parents to bring non offending treats. He does know what he can have but with adhd and cd he needs to be watch all the time! The school is peanut aware so adding coca would be easy enough(just on party days if the teachers want to be clueless). He has been given even hot coca at school! I for one bring non food treats to the parties(I don't want to kill anyone's kids!) we have given cryons,glowsticks,bracelette making kits(this was a big hit!).


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2006 7:49 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
mommywithplenty, There is actually a test for "chocolate" (which, essentially, would be a test for cocoa). Different allergists test for different foods---if you specifically request to be tested for cocoa and your allergist refuses, I'd get another allergist. Besides, if a commercially prepared test isn't available (and even sometimes if it is), allergists can do a prick test using the actual food.


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