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 Post subject: New to food allergies
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 1:48 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 12:47 am
Posts: 58
Hello all, I don't know if this is the right place to post, but I guess if it's not, it'll be moved. :D

I'm new to the whole world of food allergies. I guess I'm allergic to eggs (the whole bloody thing).

This of course is my first holiday season not being able to eat eggs and it's killing me. Thanksgiving will never be the same without pumpkin pie again. :( Does anyone else out there dread going to the grocery store this time of year? I do because I'm reminded of all the things I really, really want, but can't eat. What do people do? I'm not a big cooker and I live alone (which makes wanting to cook even harder). I did buy egg replacer, which has worked in the cornbread I made. I'm getting really depressed and just don't eat because I can't have what I really want. Does it get better? Do people adjust and their bodies don't crave things that they've been eating forever? (I'm twenty eight, apparently I have to spell that out because it turns into a smiley if I don't). If I eat something as a "substitute," something I'm not craving, I find that I end up eating more because I'm not satisfied.

I got myself a medical ID bracelet because of the allergy and my asthma, now people actually take me seriously when I go out to eat, before I don't think they did.

Any advice at all would really be appreciated because food just isn't fun anymore. It's even worse when I can't have desert and there is fruit available (this happens when I'm' eating with my mom) she'll tell me that fruit qualifies as a desert! It would have been had I not had to fill my plate with it as an appetizer and with the main course because it was all that I could eat.

Sorry this is so long and rambling, I have a really bad ankle injury and am taking some pretty strong painkillers so I'm surprised it's semi-coherent at all!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 6:54 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6455
Location: Ottawa
How long have you had your egg allery? It sounds like a recent event. If so, you need to give yourself time to coe to terms with it. There is a lot of information that needs to be taken in and yes, this is a huge lifestyle change.
Your mom, you will find is a bit slower to grasp all that encompasses this allergy because she is not living it 24/7. You will need to discuss meals before accepting an invitation to a dinner event (something that I still cringe at because I was brought up to think it's rude to ask). You may need to tuck away safe foods at various locations such as your parents and close friends, places that you might often have a meal. This way you can be assured of eating something. (Only do this if there is zero chance of cross contamination).
Egg replacers are good for baking but I have found that a combination of:
1 1/2 tbsp oil
1 1/2 tbsp water
1 tsp baking powder
works just as well and I have never used up my box of egg replacer (purchased 4 years ago :oops: ) because this works so well.
Get a vegan cook book to search out recipes. I found a good one for eggless French Toast!
It will get better, learn coping strategies and educate those around you.
Good luck!

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 10:12 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:05 pm
Posts: 528
Location: Burlington, Ontario
Hi Honugirl,

Sorry to hear about your new allergy. There is a period of adjustment and it's tough but there are others on this forum who have a lot of experience with this allergy and who will be able to answer your questions and give you advice.

Meanwhile, look up for the following thread for a safe pumpkin pie recipe:

http://www.allergicliving.com/forum/vie ... 76&start=0

_________________
15 year old - asthmatic, allergic to cats, dogs, horses, waiting to be "officially" diagnosed for anaphylaxis
12 year old - asthmatic, allergic to tree pollen and mold, OAS
Husband - Allergic to amoxycillin
Self - Allergic to housework only


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 Post subject: Hey Honu
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 3:38 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 04, 2006 12:30 am
Posts: 11
Location: Ontario
I am also new to the food allergy thing. Eggs are a tough one but from what I have seen of this forum there is a lot of support. I have an allergy cookbook at home too so I'll forward the title.

I am personally dreading the Christmas season as I am currently uncertain of just what my food triggers are. Currently I have an extensive list which seems to be growing. I am just going to be cautious and do everything in my power to relax this season!

Good luck and have a good holiday season. If it gets touch just know I'll be going through my first X-Mas as well with this new found way of life.

LBD :D

_________________
Allergies: tree nuts, peanuts, most fruits and vegies, penicillin, ceclore, advil, very cold and very warm temperatures.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 9:39 pm 
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Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 12:47 am
Posts: 58
Thanks for the support everyone. I guess I am still grieving this whole thing. :?

Thanks for the better egg replacer, I'm going to try it later. Also, thank you for pointing out the pumpkin pie recipe, that I will be trying for sure! I love my pumpkin pie. :lol:

LBD, I'll be thinking about you going through the same thing, at least I'm not alone about being new to this whole thing at holiday time. Why, oh why couldn't it have waited oh, another month to show up??????????

My parents are trying when I go home. I live in a fairly "granola" alternative lifestyle town, so finding vegan stuff isn't as much of a challenge as other places and I'm beginning to learn that I can't go to the bagel store because they had yummy egg salad sandwiches that I can no longer eat. :(


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 10:34 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
I am copying something that Susan previously posted in this forum. Developing an allergy is a lot like a death -- the death of eating as we knew it. Many people go through these stages. I don't know if this post will help you feel better at all -- but just know, we've all been there. It's been over 15 years for me now, and I still occasionally get angry or depressed. But it's usually over one specific item, and the feeling doesn't last long.

I never enjoyed cooking, but suddenly found myself having to make everything from scratch for a family of 4 which became 5 which became 7. By then, companies were starting to label better and I started being able to buy some foods.


5 STAGES OF GRIEF

1) DENIAL
In the denial stage we refuse to believe what has happened. We try in our mind to tell ourselves that life is as it was before our loss.

2) ANGER
We get angry. The anger can manifest itself in many ways. We can blame others for our loss. We can become easily agitated having emotional outbursts. We can even become angry with ourselves.

3) BARGAINING
Bargaining can be with ourselves or if you are religious with your god. Often we will offer something to try to take away the reality and pain of what has happened.

4) DEPRESSION
Depression is a very likely outcome for all people that grieve for a loss. This is what I would consider the most difficult stage of the five to deal with. There can be a the feeling listlessness and tiredness. You may be wandering around in a daze thinking that you are feeling numb. You may be bursting helplessly into tears. Feeling like there is no purpose to life any more. Feeling guilty, like everything is your own fault. You may find you feel like you are being punished. Pleasure and joy can be difficult to achieve even from things and activities which you have always gained delight. There can even be thoughts of suicide. There are many different ways in which this stage of grief can manifest itself. If you at any time in this stage feel like doing yourself any harm please do seek professional counseling. Self preservation is a must.

5) ACCEPTANCE
The final stage of grief. It is when you realize that life has to go on. You can here accept your loss. You should now be able to regain your energy and goals for the future. It may take some time to get here but you will.

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 6:32 pm 
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Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 12:47 am
Posts: 58
Thanks for the stages of grief. I think I'm going through all of them except denial and acceptance. I'm in the middle.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 11:15 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
With allergies, denial is to dangerous. I think we have to skip that one. :lol:

And some people spend more time in one stage then another -- that OK. Feeling angry is OK. Feeling depressed is OK. Just try not to let it become all consuming.

And try to find something non-food related to do. It really does help. And, things will get easier with time.

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2006 3:23 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Thanks for posting the 5 stages of grief, AnnaMarie - I think it's good info.

I do think that the first everything after being diagnosed with allergies is hard. First birthday, first Thanksgiving, first Christmas... It's a real slap in the face about how much your life has changed. But it does get easier with time (and support and resources and cooking experiments, etc.).

I'm now in a place where I've accepted things and, with my DH, managed to make things work (with the noted exception of nice restaurants - just got another rejection) for my family. But it can be very tough at the beginning.

I hope we can offer lots of support and ideas for you, honugirl! Maybe instead of focussing on what you can't have, write down what you can have... or maybe a few things that you'd like to find, like a safe cookie or safe pie recipe, etc. Start small and see what happens.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2006 6:54 pm 
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Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 12:47 am
Posts: 58
Thanks those are all great ideas.

I think one of my biggest problems is worrying about being able to travel and get the nutrition that I need when I'm not at home. I referee hockey and sometimes travel for tournaments and don't really have much of a choice where I stay and if it's got a kitchenette (not like when I'm doing 4-5 games a day I want to cook anyway, I'm too tired!). I'm also worried about having to cut out one of my main protein sources and all the other things that have egg in them and still be able to eat enough to sustain the amount of calories that I put out.

I'm also planning on running the NYC marathon next year and will need to use those prepackaged food bars because that's what will be available along the course or I have to haul them all myself (I've got enough extra weight already without that!).

I appreciate all the support I've received so far. Believe me, it's nice to have some people that understand. Not that my parent's don't understand, they just have a different perspective. Especially my mom and her fruit.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 10, 2006 10:10 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
I was re-reading your original post and you said
Quote:
I guess I'm allergic to eggs (the whole bloody thing).


Does this mean you were or were not tested? There are two reasons this would be important. Firstly, you might only be allergic to one part -- either the yolk or the albumin -- and it can make a difference in what products you can eat. Secondly, sometimes a person who is not allergic has problems with a particular food for some reason, but it's only temporary.

Actually, there is a third reason to get tested. Originally, I thought I was allergic to one ingredient, but it turned out I was actually allergic to something completely different. (I thought I was allergic to wheat, but it was sesame seeds.)

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 10, 2006 9:00 pm 
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Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 12:47 am
Posts: 58
I was tested. I'm allergic to the whole bloody thing. White and yolk. That was sort of my denial response. :oops: The I guess part, I mean. I am. I hate it. I want my eggs back.

I wish they made some of those funny allergy aware t-shirts for kids for adults, maybe it would make me see some sort of humor about this.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 10, 2006 10:43 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Check out http://www.allergyware.com/ - you might find something there. :)

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2006 6:51 am 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6455
Location: Ottawa
If you travel a lot, you may want to investigate chain restaurants to see if there are any you can eat at. It would be a starting point but you would have to speak with the manager and the chef to ensure it is safe.(ingredients, preparation surfaces etc.)

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2006 12:00 pm 
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Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 12:47 am
Posts: 58
Thanks for the tip on allergyaware. I did check with them, but I live in the states, so they are checking on shipping.

Thanks for the thought on checking chain restaurants too. I've been working on that. There are a lot of chain restaurants out there that are not good about posting stuff on their websites. It's very frustrating.


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